Evaluating Oscilloscopes (Part 2)

This is Part 2 of my mini-series on selecting an oscilloscope. Rather than a completely thorough guide, it’s more a “collection of notes” based on my own research. But I hope you find it useful, and it might cover a few areas you hadn’t considered.

Last week I mentioned the differences between PC-based and stand-alone oscilloscopes and discussed the physical probe’s characteristics. This week I’ll be discussing the “core” specifications: analog bandwidth, sample rate, and analog-to-digital converter (ADC) resolution.

Topic 1: Analog Bandwidth
Many useful articles online discuss the analog oscilloscope bandwidth, so I won’t dedicate too much time to it. Briefly, the analog bandwidth is typically measured as the “half-power” or -3 dB point, as shown in Figure 1. Half the power means 1/√2 of the voltage. Assume you put a 10-MHz, 1-V sine wave into your 100-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope. You expect to see a 1-V sine wave on the oscilloscope. As you increase the frequency of the sine wave, you would instead expect to see around 0.707 V when you pass a 100-MHz sine wave. If you want to see this in action, watch my video in which I sweep the input frequency to an oscilloscope through the -3 dB point.

Figure 1: The bandwidth refers to the "half-power" or -3 dB  point. If we drove a sine wave of constant amplitude and increasing frequency into the probe, the -3 dB point would be when the amplitude measured in the scope was 0.707 times the initial amplitude.

Figure 1: The bandwidth refers to the “half-power” or -3 dB point. If we drive a sine wave of constant amplitude and increasing frequency into the probe, the -3 dB point would be when the amplitude measured in the scope is 0.707 times the initial amplitude.

Unfortunately, you are likely to be measuring square waves (e.g., in digital systems) and not sine waves. Square waves contain high-frequency components well beyond the fundamental frequency of the wave. For this reason the “rule of thumb”  is to select an oscilloscope with five times the analog bandwidth of the highest–frequency digital signal you would be measuring. Thus, a 66-MHz clock would require a 330-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope.

If you are interested in more details about bandwidth selection, I encourage you to see one of the many excellent guides. Adafruit has a blog post “Why Oscilloscope Bandwidth Matters” that offers more information, along with links to guides from Agilent Technologies and Tektronix.

If you want to play around yourself, I’ve got a Python script that applies analog filtering to a square wave and plots the results, available here. Figure 2 shows an example of a 50-MHz square wave with 50-MHz, 100-MHz, 250-MHz, and 500-MHz analog bandwidth.

Figure 2: This shows sampling a 50-MHz square wave with 50, 100, 250, and 500-MHz of analog bandwidth.

Figure 2: This shows sampling a 50-MHz square wave with 50, 100, 250, and 500 MHz of analog bandwidth.

Topic 2: Sample Rate
Beyond the analog bandwidth, oscilloscopes also prominently advertise the sample rate. Typically, this is in MS/s (megasamples per second) or GS/s (gigasamples per second). The advertised rate is nearly always the maximum if using a single channel. If you are using both channels on a two-channel oscilloscope that advertises 1 GS/s, typically the maximum rate is actually 500 MS/s for both channels.

So what rate do you need? If you are familiar with the Nyquist criterion, you might simply think you should have a sample rate two times the analog bandwidth. Unfortunately, we tend to work in the time domain (e.g., looking at the oscilloscope screen) and not the frequency domain. So you can’t simply apply that idea. Instead, it’s useful to have a considerably higher sample rate compared to analog bandwidth, say, a five times higher sample rate. To illustrate why, see Figure 3. It shows a 25.3-MHz square wave, which I’ve sampled with an oscilloscope with 50-MHz analog bandwidth. As you would expect, the signal rounds off considerably. However, if I only sample it at 100 MS/s, at first sight the signal is almost unrecognizable! Compare that with the 500 MS/s sample rate, which more clearly looks like a square wave (but rounded off due to analog bandwidth limitation).

Again, these figures both come from my Python script, so they are based purely on “theoretical” limits of sample rate. You can play around with sample rate and bandwidth to get an idea of how a signal might look.

Figure 3

Figure 3: This shows sampling a 25.3-MHz square wave at 100 MS/s results in a signal that looks considerably different than you might expect! Sampling at 500 MS/s results in a much more “proper” looking wave.

Topic 3: Equivalent Time Sampling
Certain oscilloscopes have an equivalent time sampling (ETS) mode, which advertises an insanely fast sample rate. For example, the PicoScope 6000 series, which has a 5 GS/s sample rate, can use ETS mode and achieve 200 GS/s on a single channel, or 50 GS/s on all channels.

The caveat is that this high sample rate is achieved by doing careful phase shifts of the A/D sampling clock to sample “in between” the regular intervals. This requires your input waveform be periodic and very stable, since the waveform will actually be “built up” over a longer time interval.

So what does this mean to you? Luckily, many actual waveforms are periodic, and you might find ETS mode very useful. For example, if you want to measure the phase shift in two clocks through a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), you can do this with ETS. At 50 GS/s, you would have 20 ps resolution on the measurement! In fact, that resolution is so high you could measure the phase difference due to a few centimeters difference in PCB trace.

To demonstrate this, I can show you a few videos. To start with, the simple video below shows moving the probes around while looking at the phase difference.

A more practical demonstration, available in the following video, measures the phase shift of two paths routed through an FPGA.

Finally, if you just want to see a sine wave using ETS you can check out the bandwdith demonstration  I referred to earlier in the this article. The video (see below) includes a portion using ETS mode.

 

Topic 4: ADC Resolution
A less prominently advertised feature of certain oscilloscopes is the ADC bit resolution in the front end. Briefly, the ADC resolution tells you how the analog waveform will get mapped to the digital domain. If you have an 8-bit ADC, this means you have 28 = 256 possible numbers the digital waveform can represent. Say you have a ±5 V range on the oscilloscope—a total span of 10 V. This means the ADC can resolve 10 V / 256 = 39.06 mV difference on the input voltage.

This should tell you one fact about digital oscilloscopes: You should always use the smallest possible range to get the finest granularity. That same 8-bit ADC on a ±1 V range would resolve 7.813 mV. However, what often happens is your signal contains multiple components—say, spiking to 7 V during a load switch, and then settling to 0.5 V. This precludes you from using the smaller range on the input, since you want to capture the amplitude of that 7-V spike.

If, however, you had a 12-bit ADC, that 10 V span (+5 V to -5 V) would be split into 212 = 4,096 numbers, meaning the resolution is now 2.551 mV.  If you had a 16-bit ADC, that 10-V range would give you 216 = 65,536 numbers, meaning you could resolve down to 0.1526 mV. Most of the time, you have to choose between a faster ADC with lower (typically 8-bit) resolution or a slower ADC with higher resolution. The only exception to this I’m aware of is the Pico Technology FlexRes 5000 series devices, which allow you to dynamically switch between 8/12/14/15/16 bits with varying changes to the number of channels and sample rate.

While the typical ADC resolution seems to be 8 bits for most scopes, there are higher-resolution models too. As mentioned, these devices are permanently in high-resolution mode, so you have to decide at purchasing time if you want a very high sample rate, or a very high resolution. For example, Cleverscope has always advertised higher resolutions, and their devices are available in 10, 12, or 14 bits. Cleverscope seems to sell the “digitizer” board separately, giving you some flexibility in upgrading to a higher-resolution ADC. TiePie engineering has devices available from 8–14 bits with various sample rate options. Besides the FlexRes device I mentioned, Pico Technology offers some fixed resolution devices in higher 14-bit resolution. Some of the larger manufacturers also have higher-resolution devices, for example Teledyne LeCroy has its High Resolution Oscilloscope (HRO), which is a fixed 12-bit device.

Note that many devices will advertise either an “effective” or “software enhanced” bit resolution higher than the actual ADC resolution. Be careful with this: software enhancement is done via filtering, and you need to be aware of the possible resulting changes to your measurement bandwidth. Two resources with more details on this mode include the ECN magazine article “How To Get More than 8 Bits from Your 8-bit Scope” and the Teledyne LeCroy application note “Enhanced Resolution.” Remember that a 12-bit, 100-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope is not the same as an 8-bit, 100-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope with resolution enhancement!

Using the oscilloscope’s fast Fourier transform (FFT) mode (normally advertised as the spectrum analyzer mode), we can see the difference a higher-resolution ADC makes. When looking at a waveform on the screen, you may think that you don’t care at all about 14-bit accuracy or something similar. However, if you plan to do measurements such as total harmonic distortion (THD), or otherwise need accurate information about frequency components, having high resolution may be extremely important to achieve a reasonable dynamic range.

As a theoretical example I’m using my script mentioned earlier, which will digitize a perfect sine wave and then display the frequency spectrum. The number of bits in the ADC (e.g., quantization) is adjustable, so the harmonic component is solely due to quantization error. This is shown in Figure 4. If you want to see a version of this using a real instrument, I conduct a similar demonstration in this video.

Certain applications may find the higher bit resolution a necessity. For example, if you are working in high-fidelity audio applications, you won’t be too worried about an extremely high sample rate, but you will need the high resolution.

Figure 4: In the frequency domain, the effect of limited quantization bits is much more apparent. Here a 10-MHz pure sine wave frequency spectrum is taken using a different number of bits during the quantization process.

Figure 4: In the frequency domain, the effect of limited quantization bits is much more apparent. Here a 10-MHz pure sine wave frequency spectrum is taken using a different number of bits during the quantization process. (CLICK TO ZOOM)

Coming Up
This week I’ve taken a look at some of the core specifications. I hope the questions to ask when purchasing an oscilloscope are becoming clearer! Next week, I’ll be looking at the software running the oscilloscope, and details such as remote control, FFT features, digital decoding, and buffer types. The fourth and final week will delve into a few remaining features such as external trigger and clock synchronization and will summarize all the material I’ve covered in this series.

Author’s note: Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure example specifications are accurate. There may, however, be errors or omissions in this article. Please confirm all referenced specifications with the device vendor.

Configurable Regulator

LinearThe LTM4644 quad output step-down µModule (micromodule) regulator is configurable as a single (16-A), dual (12-A, 4-A, or 8-A, 8-A), triple (8-A, 4-A, 4-A), or quad (4-A each) output regulator. This flexibility enables system designers to rely on one simple and compact µModule regulator for the various voltage and load current requirements of FPGAs, ASICs, and microprocessors as well as other board circuitry. The LTM4644 is ideal for communications, data storage, industrial, transportation, and medical system applications.

The LTM4644 regulator includes DC/DC controllers, power switches, inductors and compensation components. Only eight external ceramic capacitors (1206 or smaller case sizes) and four feedback resistors (0603 case size) are required to regulate four independently adjustable outputs from 0.6 to 5.5 V. Separate input pins enable the four channels to be powered from a common supply rail or different rails from 4 to 14 V.

At an ambient temperature of 55°C, the LTM4644 delivers up to 13 A at 1.5 V from a 12-V input or up to 14 A with 200-LFM airflow. The four channels operate at 90° out-of-phase to minimize input ripple whether at the 1-MHz default switching frequency or synchronized to an external clock between 700 kHz and 1.3 MHz. With the addition of an external bias supply above 4 V, the LTM4644 can regulate from an input supply voltage as low as 2.375 V. The regulator also includes output overvoltage and overcurrent fault protection.

The LTM4644 costs $22.85 each in 1,000-unit quantities.

Linear Technology Corp.
www.linear.com

Q&A: Hacker, Roboticist, and Website Host

Dean “Dino” Segovis is a self-taught hardware hacker and maker from Pinehurst, NC. In 2011, he developed the Hack A Week website, where he challenges himself to create and post weekly DIY projects. Dino and I recently talked about some of his favorite projects and products. —Nan Price, Associate Editor

 

NAN: You have been posting a weekly project on your website, Hack A Week, for almost three years. Why did you decide to create the website?

Dean "Dino" Segovis at his workbench

Dean “Dino” Segovis at his workbench

DINO: One day on the Hack A Day website I saw a post that caught my attention. It was seeking a person to fill a potential position as a weekly project builder and video blogger. It was offering a salary of $35,000 a year, which was pretty slim considering you had to live in Santa Monica, CA. I thought, “I could do that, but not for $35,000 a year.”

That day I decided I was going to challenge myself to come up with a project and video each week and see if I could do it for at least one year. I came up with a simple domain name, www.hackaweek.com, bought it, and put up a website within 24 h.

My first project was a 555 timer-based project that I posted on April 1, 2011, on my YouTube channel, “Hack A Week TV.” I made it through the first year and just kept going. I currently have more than 3.2 million video views and more than 19,000 subscribers from all over the world.

NAN: Hack A Week features quite a few robotics projects. How are the robots built? Do you have a favorite?

rumblebot head

Dino’s very first toy robot hack was the Rumble robot. The robot featured an Arduino that sent PWM to the on-board H-bridge in the toy to control the motors for tank steering. A single PING))) sensor helped with navigation.

Rumble robot

The Rumble robot

DINO: I usually use an Arduino as the robot’s controller and Roomba gear motors for locomotion. I have built a few others based on existing wheeled motorized toys and I’ve made a few with the Parallax Propeller chip.

My “go-to” sensor is usually the Parallax PING))) ultrasonic sensor. It’s easy to connect and work with and the code is straightforward. I also use bump sensors, which are just simple contact switches, because they mimic the way some insects navigate.

Nature is a great designer and much can be learned from observing it. I like to keep my engineering simple because it’s robust and easy to repair. The more you complicate a design, the more it can do. But it also becomes more likely that something will fail. Failure is not a bad thing if it leads to a better design that overcomes the failure. Good design is a balance of these things. This is why I leave my failures and mistakes in my videos to show how I arrive at the end result through some trial and error.

My favorite robot would be “Photon: The Video and Photo Robot” that I built for the 2013 North Carolina Maker Faire. It’s my masterpiece robot…so far.

NAN: Tell us a little more about Photon. Did you encounter any challenges while developing the robot?

Photon awaits with cameras rolling, ready to go forth and record images.

Photon awaits with cameras rolling, ready to go forth and record images.

DINO: The idea for Photon first came to me in February 2013. I had been playing with the Emic 2 text-to-speech module from Parallax and I thought it would be fun to use it to give a robot speech capability. From there the idea grew to include cameras that would record and stream to the Internet what the robot saw and then give the robot the ability to navigate through the crowd at Maker Faire.

I got a late start on the project and ended up burning the midnight oil to get it finished in time. One of the bigger challenges was in designing a motorized base that would reliably move Photon across a cement floor.

The problem was in dealing with elevation changes on the floor covering. What if Photon encountered a rug or an extension cord?

I wanted to drive it with two gear motors salvaged from a Roomba 4000 vacuum robot to enable tank-style steering. A large round base with a caster at the front and rear worked well, but it would only enable a small change in surface elevation. I ended up using that design and made sure that it stayed away from anything that might get it in trouble.

The next challenge was giving Photon some sensors so it could navigate and stay away from obstacles. I used one PING))) sensor mounted on its head and turned the entire torso into a four-zone bump sensor, as was a ring around the base. The ring pushed on a series of 42 momentary contact switches connected together in four zones. All these sensors were connected to an Arduino running some simple code that turned Photon away from obstacles it encountered. Power was supplied by a motorcycle battery mounted on the base inside the torso.

The head held two video cameras, two smartphones in camera mode, and one GoPro camera. One video camera and the GoPro were recording in HD; the other video camera was recording in time-lapse mode. The two smartphones streamed live video, one via 4G to a Ustream channel and the other via Wi-Fi. The Ustream worked great, but the Wi-Fi failed due to interference.

Photon’s voice came from the Emic 2 connected to another Arduino sending it lines of text to speak. The audio was amplified by a small 0.5-W LM386 amplifier driving a 4” speaker. An array of blue LEDs mounted on the head illuminated with the brightness modulated by the audio signal when Photon spoke. The speech was just a lot of lines of text running in a timed loop.

Photon’s brain includes two Arduinos and an LM386 0.5-W audio amplifier with a sound-to-voltage circuit added to drive the mouth LED array. Photon’s voice comes from a Parallax Emic 2 text-to-speech module.

Photon’s brain includes two Arduinos and an LM386 0.5-W audio amplifier with a sound-to-voltage circuit added to drive the mouth LED array. Photon’s voice comes from a Parallax Emic 2 text-to-speech module.

Connecting all of these things together was very challenging. Each component needed a regulated power supply, which I built using LM317T voltage regulators. The entire current draw with motors running was about 1.5 A. The battery lasted about 1.5 h before needing a recharge. I had an extra battery so I could just swap them out during the quick charge cycle and keep downtime to a minimum.

I finished the robot around 11:00 PM the night before the event. It was a hit! The videos Photon recorded are fascinating to watch. The look of wonder on people’s faces, the kids jumping up to see themselves in the monitors, the smiles, and the interaction are all very interesting.

NAN: Many of your Hack A Week projects include Parallax products. Why Parallax?

DINO: Parallax is a great electronics company that caters to the DIY hobbyist. It has a large knowledge base on its website as well as a great forum with lots of people willing to help and share their projects.

About a year ago Parallax approached me with an offer to supply me with a product in exchange for featuring it in my video projects on Hack A Week. Since I already used and liked the product, it was a perfect offer. I’ll be posting more Parallax-based projects throughout the year and showcasing a few of them on the ELEV-8 quadcopter as a test platform.

NAN: Let’s change topics. You built an Electronic Fuel Injector Tester, which is featured on HomemadeTools.net. Can you explain how the 555 timer chips are used in the tester?

DINO: 555 timers are great! They can be used in so many projects in so many ways. They’re easy to understand and use and require only a minimum of external components to operate and configure.

The 555 can run in two basic modes: monostable and astable.

Dino keeps this fuel injector tester in his tool box at work. He’s a European auto technician by day.

Dino keeps this fuel injector tester in his tool box at work. He’s a European auto technician by day.

An astable circuit produces a square wave. This is a digital waveform with sharp transitions between low (0 V) and high (+ V). The durations of the low and high states may be different. The circuit is called astable because it is not stable in any state: the output is continually changing between “low” and “high.”

A monostable circuit produces a single output pulse when triggered. It is called a monostable because it is stable in just one state: “output low.” The “output high” state is temporary.

The injector tester, which is a monostable circuit, is triggered by pressing the momentary contact switch. The single-output pulse turns on an astable circuit that outputs a square-wave pulse train that is routed to an N-channel MOSFET. The MOSFET turns on and off and outputs 12 V to the injector. A flyback diode protects the MOSFET from the electrical pulse that comes from the injector coil when the power is turned off and the field collapses. It’s a simple circuit that can drive any injector up to 5 A.

This is a homebrew PCB for Dino's fuel injector tester. Two 555s drive a MOSFET that switches the injector.

This is a homebrew PCB for Dino’s fuel injector tester. Two 555s drive a MOSFET that switches the injector.

NAN: You’ve been “DIYing” for quite some time. How and when did your interest begin?

DINO: It all started in 1973 when I was 13 years old. I used to watch a TV show on PBS called ZOOM, which was produced by WGBH in Boston. Each week they had a DIY project they called a “Zoom-Do,” and one week the project was a crystal radio. I ordered the Zoom-Do instruction card and set out to build one. I got everything put together but it didn’t work! I checked and rechecked everything, but it just wouldn’t work.

I later realized why. The instructions said to use a “cat’s whisker,” which I later found out was a thin piece of wire. I used a real cat’s whisker clipped from my cat! Anyway, that project sparked something inside me (pun intended). I was hooked! I started going house to house asking people if they had any broken or unwanted radios and or TVs I could have so I could learn about electronics and I got tons of free stuff to mess with.

My mom and dad were pretty cool about letting me experiment with it all. I was taking apart TV sets, radios, and tape recorders in my room and actually fixing a few of them. I was in love with electronics. I had an intuition for understanding it. I eventually found some ham radio guys who were great mentors and I learned a lot of good basic electronics from them.

NAN: Is there a particular electronics engineer, programmer, or designer who has inspired the work you do today?

DINO: Forrest Mims was a great inspiration in my early 20s. I got a big boost from his “Engineer’s Notebooks.” The simple way he explained things and his use of graph paper to draw circuit designs really made learning about electronics easy and fun. I still use graph paper to draw my schematics during the design phase and for planning when building a prototype on perf board. I’m not interested in any of the software schematic programs because most of my projects are simple and easy to draw. I like my pencil-and-paper approach.

NAN: What was the last electronics-design related product you purchased and what type of project did you use it with?

DINO: An Arduino Uno. I used two of these in the Photon robot.

NAN: What new technologies excite you and why?

DINO: Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). They’ll totally change the way we manufacture and use digital displays.

I envision a day when you can go buy your big-screen TV that you’ll bring home in a cardboard tube, unroll it, and place it on the wall. The processor and power supply will reside on the floor, out of the way, and a single cable will go to the panel. The power consumption will be a fraction of today’s LCD or plasma displays and they’ll be featherweight by comparison. They’ll be used to display advertising on curved surfaces anywhere you like. Cell phone displays will be curved and flexible.

How about a panoramic set of virtual reality goggles or a curved display in a flight simulator? Once the technology gets out of the “early adopter” phase, prices will come down and you’ll own that huge TV for a fraction of what you pay now. One day we might even go to a movie and view it on a super-huge OLED panorama screen.

NAN: Final question. If you had a full year and a good budget to work on any design project you wanted, what would you build?

DINO: There’s a project I’ve wanted to build for some time now: A flight simulator based on the one used in Google Earth. I would use a PC to run the simulator and build a full-on seat-inside enclosure with all the controls you would have in a jet airplane. There are a lot of keyboard shortcuts for a Google flight simulator that could be triggered by switches connected to various controls (e.g., rudder pedals, flaps, landing gear, trim tabs, throttle, etc.). I would use the Arduino Leonardo as the controller for the peripheral switches because it can emulate a USB keyboard. Just program it, plug it into a USB port along with a joystick, build a multi-panel display (or use that OLED display I dream of), and go fly!

Google Earth’s flight simulator also lets you fly over the surface of Mars! Not only would this be fun to build and fly, it would also be a great educational tool. It’s definitely on the Hack A Week project list!

Editor’s Note: This article also appears in the Circuit Cellar’s upcoming March issue, which focuses on robotics. The March issue will soon be available for membership download or single-issue purchase.

 

Basic Goertzel (EE Tip #120)

The basic Goertzel transform, which has been around since 1958, was derived from the discrete Fourier transform (DFT). It’s an extremely efficient method of detecting a single frequency component in a block of input data. Figure 1 depicts the signal flow for the basic Goertzel algorithm as each sample is processed.

Figure 1:  Figure 1—The signal flow of the basic Goertzel transform produces an output (y0) for each sample processed. The output is a combination of the current ADC sample added to the product of the previous output (y1) multiplied by a constant minus the previous output (y2). After a block of samples has been processed, the sum of the squares of y1 and y2 are computed to determine the relative amplitude of a particular frequency.

Figure 1: The signal flow of the basic Goertzel transform produces an output (y0) for each sample processed. The output is a combination of the current ADC sample added to the product of the previous output (y1) multiplied by a constant minus the previous output (y2). After a block of samples has been processed, the sum of the squares of y1 and y2 are computed to determine the relative amplitude of a particular frequency.

Figure 1 may be written as Equation 1. y0 is the current processed output. x0 is the current ADC sample. y1 is the previously processed output, and y2 is the next previously processed output. m is the frequency domain bin number. N is the sample block size. Input samples are processed on a sample-by-sample basis. Processing continues over a block of input data of the length N. After a block of data has been processed, magnitude and phase information for the signal of interest is contained in the y1 and y2 variables.

Equations 1 - 4

Equations 1 – 4

One of the advantages of the Goertzel transform is that the magnitude (and phase) computation needs to be performed only at the end of a block of data. After a block of data has passed through Equation 1, the relative magnitude may be determined by computing the sum of the squares of the real and imaginary components.

The real component (RC) is described as Equation 2. The imaginary component is calculated with Equation 3. The squared magnitude is computed with Equation 4.

For tone detection only, phase information may be ignored. It’s sufficient to compute the square of the magnitude to determine the relative power of a signal.—Eric Kiser, “Digital Decoding Simplified,” Circuit Cellar 182, 2005. The issue is available in the CC Webshop.

 

 

An Organized Space for Programming, Writing, and Soldering

AndersonPhoto1

Photo 1—This is Anderson’s desk when he is not working on any project. “I store all my ‘gear’ in a big plastic bin with several smaller bins inside, which keeps the mess down. I have a few other smaller storage bins as well hidden here and there,” Anderson explained.

AndersonPhoto2

Photo 2—Here is Anderson’s area set up for soldering and running his oscilloscope. “I use a soldering mat to protect my desk surface,” he says. “The biggest issue I have is the power cords from different things getting in my way.”

Al Anderson’s den is the location for a variety of ongoing projects—from programming to writing to soldering. He uses several plastic bins to keep his equipment neatly organized.

Anderson is the IT Director for Salish Kootenai College, a small tribal college based in Pablo, MT. He described some of his workspace features via e-mail:

I work on many different projects. Lately I have been doing more programming. I am getting ready to write a book on the Xojo development system.

Another project I have in the works is using a Raspberry Pi to control my hot tub. The hot tub is about 20 years old, and I want to have better control over what it is doing. Plus I want it to have several features. One feature is a wireless interface that would be accessible from inside the house. The other is a web control of the hot tub so I can turn it on when we are still driving back from skiing to soak my tired old bones.

I am also working on a home yard sprinkler system. I laid some of the pipe last fall and have been working on and off with the controller. This spring I will put in the sprinkler heads and rest of the pipe. I tend to like working with small controllers (e.g., the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBoard’s BeagleBone, and Arduino) and I have a lot of those boards in various states.

Anderson’s article about a Raspberry Pi-based monitoring device will appear in Circuit Cellar’s April issue. You can follow him on Twitter at @skcalanderson.

Data Acquisition Card with Real-Time Data Calculation

HBMHBM’s GN610 and GN611 isolated 1-kV data cards now include real-time data calculation capabilities. The new cards feature an isolated data acquisition card, which enables the data recorders to perform real-time calculations on the fly while providing users with immediate results.

The new card also helps Genesis High Speed recorders calculate more precise results. The 1-kV card provides values per half cycle at sampling rates of up to 2 million samples per second at voltages up to 1,000 V. For example, users can see dynamic data (e.g., currents and voltages) produced when an electric motor is accelerated.

The system’s sampling rate can be automatically switched following a trigger event in the real-time calculation channels. Maximum sampling rates are only used for particularly critical measurement events. This results in smaller data files, which increases testing efficiency.

The Genesis 1-kV card ensures fast and secure processing of large data sets, improving how the software streams data to memory and displays it to the user.

Contact HBM for pricing.

HBM, Inc.
www.hbm.com

Evaluating Oscilloscopes (Part 1)

Recently, I was in the market for a new oscilloscope. There’s a good selection of devices for sale, but which should you choose? It’s clear from the ads that the “scope bandwidth” and “sample rate” are two important parameters. But are there other things hidden in the specification sheet you should take a look at?

I’ve compiled notes from my own oscilloscope-selection experience and wanted to share them with you. I’ll be pulling in specifications and examples from a few different oscilloscopes. Personally, I ended up selecting a PicoScope device, so I will be featuring it more prominently in my comparisons. But that’s simply because I don’t have a lab full of oscilloscopes to photograph! I don’t work for Pico Technology or have any affiliation with it, and will be attempting to pull in other manufacturers for this online series to provide some balance.

This “mini-series” will consist of four posts over four weeks. I won’t be discussing bandwidth and sample rate until next week. In this first post, I’ll cover some physical characteristics: stand-alone vs PC-based probe types and digital inputs. Next week I’ll discuss the “core” specifications, in particular the bandwidth, sample rate, and analog-to-digital converter resolution. The  third week will look at the software running the oscilloscope, and details such as remote control, fast Fourier transform (FFT) features, digital decoding, and buffer types. The final week will consider a few remaining features such as the external trigger and clock synchronization, and will summarize all the material I’ve covered.

I hope you find it useful!

Topic 1: Do You Want a PC-Based or Stand-Alone Instrument?
There are two fundamentally different types of instruments, and you’ll have to decide for yourself which you prefer. Many people like a stand-alone instrument, which you can place on your bench and probe your circuits to your heart’s content. You don’t need to have your computer nearby, and you have something solely dedicated to probing.

Figure 1: PC-based oscilloscopes make it easier to mount on a crowded bench. This PicoScope 6000 unit is velcroed to my desk, you can see the computer monitor to the upper left.

Photo 1: PC-based oscilloscopes make mounting easier on a crowded bench. This PicoScope 6000 unit is velcroed to my desk. You can see the computer monitor to the upper left.

The other option is a PC-based instrument, which today generally means it plugs in via USB. I’ve always preferred this type for a few reasons. The first is the minimal desk space needed. I can place an oscilloscope vertically and lose little space (see Photo 1). The second is I find it easier to interact with a standard keyboard and mouse, especially if you’re using more advanced features. In addition, you can easily save screenshots or data from the scope without having to transfer them using a USB key or something similar.

There are a few downsides to USB-based instruments. The most common complaint is probably the lack of knobs, although that’s fixable. In Photo 2, you can see a USB-based “knob board” I built, which pretends to be a USB key. Each turn of the knob sends a keystroke and, as long as your PC-based oscilloscope software lets you set custom keyboard shortcuts, can trigger features such as changing the input range or timebase. Most of the time, I still just use the regular PC interface, as I find it easier than knobs. If you’re interested in the design, you can find it on my blog Electronics & More.

Photo: A simple USB-based knob board uses mechanical encoders to control the USB scope via a physical panel.

Photo 2: A simple USB-based knob board uses mechanical encoders to control the USB scope via a physical panel.

Having a PC-based oscilloscope also means you can have a massive screen. A high-end oscilloscope will advertise a “large 12.1″ screen,” but you can purchase a 22″ screen for your computer for $200 or less.  If your PC-based oscilloscope software supports multiple “viewports,” you can more easily set up complex displays such as that in Figure 1.
Again this comes down to personal preference—personally, I like having the oscilloscope display as a window on my computer. You may wish to have a dedicated display separate from your other work, in which case consider a stand-alone device!

Figure 1: PC-based oscilloscopes make it easier for setting up windows in specific positions, due to a combination of much larger screen space and standard mouse/keyboard interaction.

Figure 1: PC-based oscilloscopes make it easier for setting up windows in specific positions, due to a combination of much larger screen space and standard mouse/keyboard interaction.

Topic 2: Where’s the Ground?
One common complaint with the PC-based oscilloscope is that the probe ground connects to USB ground. Thus, you need to ensure there isn’t a voltage difference between the ground of your device under test and the computer.

This is, in fact, a general limitation of most oscilloscopes, be they stand-alone or PC-based. If you check with an ohmmeter, you’ll generally find that the ”probe ground”  in fact connects to system Earth on stand-alone oscilloscopes. Or at least it did on the different Agilent units I tested. Thus the complaint is somewhat unfairly leveled at PC-based devices.

You can get oscilloscopes that have either “differential” or “isolated” inputs, which are designed to eliminate the problem of grounds shorting out between different inputs. They may also give you more measurement flexibility. For example, if you are trying to measure the voltage across a “high-side shunt resistor,” you can do this measurement differentially. The TiePie engineering  HS4 DIFF is one example of a device with this capability. Of course, you can purchase differential probes for any oscilloscope, which accomplish the same goal! Most manufactures make these differential probes (Agilent, Tektronix, Pico Technology, Rigol, etc.).

Topic 3: Input Types
Almost every scope will have either DC-coupled or AC-coupled inputs. You’ll likely want to compare the minimum/maximum voltage ranges the scope has. Don’t be too distracted by either the upper or lower limits unless you have very specific requirements. At the upper end, remember you will mostly be using the 10:1 probe, which means an oscilloscope with ±20 V input range becomes ±200 V with the 10:1 probe.

At the lower end, the noise is going to kill you. If your oscilloscope has a 1 mV/div range, for example, you’ll have to be extremely careful with noise. To probe very small signals, you’ll probably end up needing an active probe with amplification right at the measurement point. This can be something you build yourself, using a differential amplifier chip, for example, if you are attempting to measure current across a shunt.

Besides the actual measurement range, you’ll be interested in the “offset” range too. With the DC-input, most oscilloscopes can subtract a fixed voltage from the input. Thus you can measure a 1.2-V input on a 1-V maximum input range, as the oscilloscope is able to first subtract say 1 V from the signal. This is handy if you have a smaller signal riding on top of some fixed voltage.

Another input type you will encounter is the 50-Ω input. Normally, this means the oscilloscope can switch between AC, DC, and DC 50 input types. The DC 50 means the input is “terminated” with a 50-Ω impedance. This feature is typically found on oscilloscopes with higher analog bandwidth. For example, this allows you to measure a clock signal that is output on a SMA connector expecting a 50-Ω termination. In addition, the 50-Ω input allows you to simplify connection of other lab equipment to your oscilloscope. Want to use a low noise amplifier (LNA) to measure a very small signal? Not a problem, since you can properly terminate the output of that LNA.

If you end up needing DC 50 termination, you can buy “feed-through” terminators for about $15, which operate at up to 1-GHz bandwidth. You simply add those to the front of your oscilloscope to get 50-Ω terminated inputs.

Any given manufacturer will often have a range of inputs for different bandwidths and models. For example, the PicoScope 5000-series, which has up to 200-MHz bandwidth, has DC/AC high-impedance inputs. The 6000-series has DC/AC/DC 50 inputs for 500-MHz bandwidth and below. The 6000 series in 1,000 MHz bandwidth only has 50-Ω input impedance. Other manufacturers seem to follow a similar formula: the highest bandwidth device is 50-Ω input only, medium-bandwidth devices are DC/AC/DC 50, and lower-bandwidth devices will be DC/AC.

Topic 4: Probe Quality and Type
In day-to-day use, nothing will impact you more than the quality of your oscilloscope probe. This is your hands-on interaction with the oscilloscope.

Figure 4: A smaller spring-loaded probe tip is on the left,  and  a standard oscilloscope probe is on the right. Both  probes have removable tips, so if you damage the probe it’s easy to fix them. Not all probes have removable tips, however, meaning if the tip is damaged you may have to throw out the probe.

Photo 3: A smaller spring-loaded probe tip is on the left, and a standard oscilloscope probe is on the right. Both probes have removable tips, so if you damage the probe it’s easy to fix them. Not all probes have removable tips, however, meaning if the tip is damaged you may have to throw out the probe.

Most “standard” oscilloscope probes are of the type pictured to the right in Photo 3. They are normally switchable from 1:1 to 10:1 attenuation, where the 10:1 mode results in a 1/10 scaling of input voltage. It’s important to note that almost every oscilloscope probe has very limited bandwidth in 1:1 mode—often under 10 MHz. Whereas in 10:1 mode it might be 300 MHz! In addition, the 10:1 mode will load the circuit considerably less. Higher bandwidth probes will often only come in 10:1 mode. I assume the physical switch is too much hassle at higher frequencies!

A first thing to check out is if the tip is removable. If you damage the tip, it can be useful to simply replace the tip rather than the entire probe. If you’re probing a PCB, it can be easy to catch a tip in a via, for example. Alternatively, certain probes might come with an adapter, which is designed for use in probing the PCB, rather than just the tip of the regular oscilloscope probe. The older Agilent 1160A probes come with such a tip.

One particular type of probe I really like has the spring-loaded tip shown to the left in Photo 3. This is a much smaller tip than “standard,” and the spring-loaded tip makes it much easier to get a good connection with solder joints. You can apply some pressure to break through the oxide layer, and the spring-loaded aspect keeps the tip right on the joint. In addition, you can even do things such as probe through the solder mask on a via. There are even plastic guard add-ons, which fit standard surface mount device (SMD) sizes (e.g., 1.27 mm, 1 mm, 0.8 mm, 0.5 mm) to probe TQFP/SOIC/TSSOP packages.

The particular probe I’m photographing comes with the PicoScope 6000 series, which is sold separately as part number TA150 (350-MHz bandwidth) or TA133 (500-MHz bandwidth). However, I’ve noticed that Agilent seems to also sell a probe that looks the same—under part number N287xA—right down to accessories. Similarly, Teledyne LeCroy also seems to sell this probe under the PP007 part number, and Rohde & Schwarz sells it under the RTM-ZP10 part number, also with the same accessories. Thus I suspect there is some upstream manufacturer! Depending on your supplier and options, prices range from $200-$400 for the probe if you want to pick it up separately.

Photo 5: The ground spring accessory can be used in a number of ways. If you're lucky, you can insert it into GND  vias on your PCB. If required, you can also solder a small section of wire to the spring.

Photo 4: The ground spring accessory can be used in a number of ways. If you’re lucky, you can insert it into GND vias on your PCB. If required, you can also solder a small section of wire to the spring.

Pomona Electronics sells a similar probe, part numbers 6491 through 6501 (the exact partnumber depending on bandwidth). The 150-MHz version (6493) is available for under $60 from Digi-Key, Mouser, and Newark element14, for example. This probe differs from the previous group of spring-loaded ones, but if you don’t need the higher bandwidth it may be a more reasonable purchase.

If you are dealing with a high-bandwidth probe, you may need to be concerned about the flatness of the frequency response. A probe may be sold with a 1G-Hz bandwidth, for example, which simply means the -3-dB point is at 1GHz. However, shoddy manufacturing may mean not having a very flat frequency response before that point, or not rolling off evenly after the -3-dB point.

When dealing with high bandwidth probes, the grounding will become a serious issue. The classic “alligator clip” probably won’t cut it anymore! The simplest accessory your probe is likely to come with is the spring adapter shown in Photo 4. There may be more advanced accessories available for grounding, too; check documentation for the probe itself. You can see an example of differences in grounding as part of my “probe review”  video.

Don’t be afraid to build your own accessories for the probe. Photo 5 shows a probe holder I built for a $15 adjustable arm. Details of the construction are here.

Here’s a simple 3-D probe holder you can build for $20 or less.

Photo 5: Here’s a simple 3-D probe holder you can build for $20 or less.

Topic 5: Digital Input?
The final item to consider is if you want digital inputs along with analog. This is, again, somewhat of a personal choice: You may wish to have a separate stand-alone digital analyzer, or you may wish to have it built into your oscilloscope.

I personally chose to have a stand-alone digital logic analyzer, which is a PC-based instrument. Digital logic analyzers are available at a fairly low cost from a variety of manufacturers (e.g., Saleae and Intronix). In my experience, the cost of purchasing a separate PC-based logic analyzer was considerably lower than the “incremental cost” of selecting an oscilloscope with logic analyzer capabilities compared to one without. When evaluating this yourself, be sure to look at features such as number of channels, maximum sample rate, buffer size, and what protocols can be decoded by the logic analyzer.

While integrated-device manufacturers claim you should buy a scope/analyzer in one unit to get perfect synchronization between digital and analog, remember many of these devices can output a trigger signal. So if your oscilloscope can output a trigger signal when it starts the analog capture, you can use this to capture the corresponding data on the digital logic analyzer (or vice versa).

Next Week: Core Specifications
This first week I covered physical details of the oscilloscope itself you might want to consider. Next week, I’ll look at the more ‘”core” specifications such as bandwidth, sample rate, and sample resolution.

Author’s note: Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure example specifications are accurate. There may, however, be errors or omissions in this article. Please confirm all referenced specifications with the device vendor.

 

Innovation Space: A Workspace for Prototyping, Programming, and Writing

RobotBASIC co-developer John Blankenship accomplishes a lot in his “cluttered” Vero Beach, FL-based workspace.

JohnBlankenship

John Blankenship in his workspace, where he develops, designs, and writes.

He develops software, designs hardware, packages robot parts for sale, and write books and magazine articles. Thus, his workspace isn’t always neat and tidy, he explained.

“The walls are covered with shelves filled with numerous books, a wide variety of parts, miscellaneous tools, several pieces of test equipment, and many robot prototypes,” he noted.

“Most people would probably find my space cluttered and confining, but for me it comforting knowing everything I might need is close at hand.”

Blankenship co-developed RobotBASIC with Samuel Mishal, a friend and talented programmer. The introductory programming language is geared toward high school-level students.

This PCB makes it easy to build a RobotBASIC-compatible robot.

This PCB makes it easy to build a RobotBASIC-compatible robot.

You can read Blankenship’s article, “Using a Simulated Robot to Decrease Development Time,” in the March 2014 edition of Circuit Cellar. He details how implementing a robotic simulation can reduce development time. Here’s an excerpt:

If you have ever built a robot, you know the physical construction and electronic aspects are only the first step. The real work begins when you start programming your creation.

A typical starting point is to develop a library of subroutines that implement basic behaviors. Later, the routines can be combined to create more complex behaviors and eventually full-blown applications. For example, navigational skills (e.g., hugging a wall, following a line, or finding a beacon) can serve as basic building blocks for tasks such as mowing a yard, finding a charging station, or delivering drinks to guests at a party. Developing basic behaviors can be difficult though, especially if they must work for a variety of situations. For instance, a behavior that enables a robot to transverse a hallway to find a specified doorway and pass through it should work properly with different-width hallways and doorways. Furthermore, the robot should at least attempt to autonomously contend with problems arising from the imprecise movements associated with most hobby robots.

Such problems can generally be solved with a closed-loop control system that continually modifies the robot’s movements based on sensor readings. Unfortunately, sensor readings in a real-world environment are often just as flawed as the robot’s movements. For example, tray reflections from ultrasonic or infrared sensors can produce erroneous sensor readings. Even when the sensors are reading correctly, faulty data can be obtained due to unexpected environmental conditions. These types of problems are generally random and are therefore difficult to detect and identify because the offending situations cannot easily be duplicated. A robot simulator can be a valuable tool in such situations.

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send your images and space info to editor@circuitcellar.com.

Wireless Data Links (Part 1)

In Circuit Cellar’s February issue, the Consummate Engineer column launches a multi-part series on wireless data links.

“Over the last two decades, wireless data communication devices have been entering the realm of embedded control,” columnist George Novacek says in Part 1 of the series. “The technology to produce reasonably priced, reliable, wireless data links is now available off the shelf and no longer requires specialized knowledge, experience, and exotic, expensive test equipment. Nevertheless, to use wireless devices effectively, an engineer should understand the principles involved.”

Radio communicationsPart 1 focuses on radio communications, in particular low-power, data-carrying wireless links used in control systems.

“Even with this limitation, it is a vast subject, the surface of which can merely be scratched,” Novacek says. “Today, we can purchase ready-made, low-power, reliable radio interface modules with excellent performance for an incredibly low price. These devices were originally developed for noncritical applications (e.g., garage door openers, security systems, keyless entry, etc.). Now they are making inroads into control systems, mostly for remote sensing and computer network data exchange. Wireless devices are already present in safety-related systems (e.g., remote tire pressure monitoring), to say nothing about their bigger and older siblings in remote control of space and military unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).”

An engineering audience will find Novacek’s article a helpful overview of fundamental wireless communications principles and topics, including RF circuitry (e.g., inductor/capacitor, or LC, circuits), ceramic surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, frequency response, bandwidth, sensitivity, noise issues, and more.

Here is an article excerpt about bandwidth and achieving its ideal, rectangular shape:

“The bandwidth affects receiver selectivity and/or a transmitter output spectral purity. The selectivity is the ability of a radio receiver to reject all but the desired signal. Narrowing the bandwidth makes it possible to place more transmitters within the available frequency band. It also lowers the received noise level and increases the selectivity due to its higher Q. On the other hand, transmission of every signal but a non-modulated, pure sinusoid carrier—which, therefore, contains no information—requires a certain minimum bandwidth. The required bandwidth is determined by the type of modulation and the maximum modulating frequency.

“For example, AM radios carry maximum 5-kHz audio and, consequently, need 10-kHz bandwidth to accommodate the carrier with its two 5-kHz sidebands. Therefore, AM broadcast stations have to be spaced a minimum of 20 kHz apart. However, narrowing the bandwidth will lead to the loss of parts of the transmitted information. In a data-carrying systems, it will cause a gradual increase of the bit error rate (BER) until the data becomes useless. At that point, the bandwidth must be increased or the baud rate must be decreased to maintain reliable communications.

“An ideal bandwidth would have a shape of a rectangle, as shown in Figure 1 by the blue trace. Achieving this to a high degree with LC circuits can get quite complicated, but ceramic resonators used in modern receivers can deliver excellent, near ideal results.”

Figure 1: This is the frequency response and bandwidth of a parallel resonant LC circuit. A series circuit graph would be inverted.

Figure 1: This is the frequency response and bandwidth of a parallel resonant LC circuit. A series circuit graph would be inverted.

To learn more about control-system wireless links, check out the February issue now available for membership download or single-issue purchase. Part 2 in Novacek’s series discusses transmitters and antennas and will appear in our March issue.

IR Remote Control Testing (EE Tip #119)

On the Internet you can find them in all shapes and sizes: circuits to test remote controls. Here I describe a simple and cheap method that is not that well-known.

This method is based on the principle that an LED does not only generate light when you apply a voltage to it, but also works in the opposite direction to generate a voltage when light falls on it. Within constraints it can therefore be used as an alternative for a proper phototransistor or photodiode. The major advantage is that you will usually have an LED around somewhere, which may not be true for a photodiode.

IR remote tester

IR remote tester

This is also true for infrared (IR) diodes and this makes them eminently suitable for testing a remote control. You only need to connect a voltmeter to the IR diode and the remote control tester is finished. Set the multimeter so it measures DC voltage and turn it on. Hold the remote control close to the IR diode and push any button. If the remote control is working then the voltage shown on the display will quickly rise. When you release the button the voltage will drop again.

However, don’t expect a very high voltage from the IR diode! The voltage generated by the diode will only be about 300 mV, but this is sufficient to show whether the remote control is working or not. There are quite a few other objects that emit IR radiation. So, first note the voltage indicated by the voltmeter before pushing any of the buttons on the remote control and use this as a reference value. Also, don’t do this test in a well lit room or a room with the sun shining in, because there is the chance that there is too much IR radiation present.

To quickly reduce the diode voltage to zero before doing the next measurement you can short-circuit the pins of the diode briefly. This will not damage the diode.—Tom van Steenkiste, Elektor, 11/2010

Want tips about testing power supplies? We’ve got you covered! EE Tip #112 will help you determine the stability of your lab or bench-top supply!

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