An Engineer Who Retires to the Garage

Jerry Brown, of Camarillo, CA, retired from the aerospace industry five years ago but continues to consult and work on numerous projects at home. For example, he plans to submit an article to Circuit Cellar about a Microchip Technology PIC-based computer display component (CDC) he designed and built for a traffic-monitoring system developed by a colleague.

Jerry Brown sits at his workbench. The black box atop the workbench is an embedded controller and is part of a traffic monitoring system he has been working on.

Jerry Brown sits at his workbench. The black box atop the workbench is an embedded controller and part of  his traffic monitoring system project.

“The traffic monitoring system is composed of a beam emitter component (BEC), a beam sensor component (BSC), and the CDC, and is intended for unmanned use on city streets, boulevards, and roadways to monitor and record the accumulative count, direction of travel, speed, and time of day for vehicles that pass by a specific location during a set time period,” he says.

Brown particularly enjoys working with PWM LED controllers. Circuit Cellar editors look forward to seeing his project article. In the meantime, he sent us the following description and pictures of the space where he conceives and executes his creative engineering ideas.

Jerry's garage-based lab.

Brown’s garage-based lab.

My workspace, which I call my “lab,” is on one side of my two-car garage and is fairly well equipped. (If you think it looks a bit messy, you should have seen it before I straightened it up for the “photo shoot.”)  

I have a good supply of passive and active electronic components, which are catalogued and, along with other parts and supplies, are stored in the cabinets and shelves alongside and above the workbench. I use the computer to write and compile software programs and to program PIC flash microcontrollers.  

The photos show the workbench and some of the instrumentation I have in the lab, including a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station.  

The black box visible on top of the workbench is an embedded controller and is part of the traffic monitoring system that I have been working on.

Instruments in Jerry's lab include a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station.

Instruments in Brown’s lab include a waveform generator, a digital storage oscilloscope, a digital multimeter, a couple of power supplies, and a soldering station. 

Brown has a BS in Electrical Engineering and a BS in Business Administration from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, CA. He worked in the aerospace industry for 30 years and retired as the Principal Engineer/Manager of a Los Angeles-area aerospace company’s electrical and software design group.

Q&A: Networking Expert Dru Lavigne

Dru Lavigne wasn’t always interested in networking applications. I recently interviewed her about how she discovered UNIX and launched her career as an OS specialist and technical writer. She also described her “to-do” list, which includes more writing, and her hopes for the future of the BSD OS.—Nan Price, Associate Editor

 

Dru LavigneNAN: What is your current occupation?

DRU: I’m the lead tech writer for iXsystems, a hardware solutions provider and corporate sponsor of the FreeNAS and PC-BSD open-source projects. Since both of these projects publish a comprehensive user’s guide with each software release, most of my time is spent making sure each guide is kept up to date as changes are made to these OSes. I’m also involved in the FreeBSD Documentation Project and I am currently assisting in updating and preparing the FreeBSD Handbook for publication in a two-volume format.

NAN: What is the FreeBSD Foundation?

DRU: The FreeBSD Foundation is a 501.c3 nonprofit that provides financial support and a legal entity for the FreeBSD Project.

The FreeBSD Foundation provides grants so developers can attend conferences and developer summits, sponsors developers to work on specific software projects that would benefit the FreeBSD community, interacts with companies that use FreeBSD to determine their needs, and assists in introducing developers to the community. As a director, I assist in fundraising and advocacy, reviewing project proposals, and developing relationships.

NAN: What is BSD? What is the difference between BSD and Linux?

DRU: BSD is a UNIX-like OS that was originally developed at the University of California Berkeley in the 1970s. When the university stopped developing the OS, several open-source projects began to continue development.

Its lineage differs from Linux as Linux is derived from a different UNIX branch known as SysV. Traditionally, the most noticeable difference is that SysV systems use run levels whereas BSD systems do not. The release engineering process also differs between BSD and Linux. BSD projects release an entire OS with a set of base tools included in the OS’s userland. The entire OS has a release engineering team that is responsible for the release and a security team that is responsible for security advisories until a release reaches its end-of-life (EOL). In contrast, Linux itself is only the kernel. Each distro integrates that kernel into its installer, package management system, and userland to create a complete OS.

NAN: How long have you been using BSD? When and how did you become interested?

DRU: I started using FreeBSD in 1997. I went “cold turkey” by installing it on my only computer and learned how to do what I needed to do as I needed to do it. Once I was comfortable with FreeBSD, I ventured into learning how to use NetBSD and OpenBSD, and when PC-BSD came along, I switched to that as my main desktop system.

NAN: Describe your involvement with the BSD Certification Group.

DRU: I founded the BSD Certification Group to create a community-based and psychometrically valid certification exam for system administrators of BSD OSes. The group is composed of volunteers who have been involved in BSD for quite some time as educators, authors, and/or system administrators. We have worked hard to provide a globally affordable examination that provides real value to employers.

NAN: You’ve written several books, including BSD Hacks, The Best of FreeBSD Basics and The Definitive Guide to PC-BSD. What can readers expect to learn from the books?

DRU: How to be comfortable on a UNIX system and how to think using the logic of a UNIX system.

NAN: Do you consider your books introductory or are they written for more experienced engineers?

DRU: These books are written in the style: “Now that you have BSD, did you know that you can do these cool things?” I’m a hands-on person and I like to know what I can do and to understand what I’m seeing when something I do acts differently than I expected it to.

The great thing about UNIX is that you can learn how to do something useful now, even if you have never seen a UNIX command line before. And, even if you’ve been around forever, there is always something you haven’t come across before or a cool new way to do something that you haven’t thought of before. So, these books can appeal to both the introductory user (the main target audience) as well as the advanced user (who will still pick up a trick or two before passing the book along to an introductory user).

NAN: Are you currently working on or planning any books or projects?

DRU: I do have a to-do list, book-wise. It’s interesting that I currently write the equivalent of three 300ish page books per year, but these are available for free online at doc.freenas.org  and wiki.pcbsd.org.

In addition, my current big project is the two-volume set for the FreeBSD Handbook, which will be a good 900 pages when it is complete. Once that project is finished, next in line is modernizing The Best of FreeBSD Basics for FreeBSD 10.x. Then, I’d like to write a second BSD Hacks-type book.

NAN: What do you consider to be the “next big thing” in the industry?

DRU: Since my expertise is in BSD, I’ll frame my answer from that perspective.
The first is creating usable frameworks for securing/sandboxing existing non-secure applications. FreeBSD is leading the development and research in this area in its Capsicum framework (see the article “Capsicum: Practical Capabilities for UNIX” on the University of Cambridge website).

The second is modern file systems that aren’t limited by the hardware restrictions that were around when most file systems were created. Examples include the OpenZFS storage platform and DragonFly BSD’s HAMMER file system.

NAN: Give us some background information. Where are you located? Where and what did you study?

DRU: I’m a recent transplant to Northwest Arkansas, having lived in Canada for many years. I went back to school in my early 30s to get a technical diploma in Networking and Telecommunications. I also earned the following certifications: MCSE, CNE, CCNA, CCSA, Security+, and probably others, which I have since forgotten.

NAN: How did you become interested in OSes and IT?

DRU: I was working in a dead-end position for a municipal department (low pay, very low glass ceiling) and wanted to expand my horizons. Many of our clients were being referred to a technical college for a networking program at a time when networking was a “hot” topic.

I had no idea what networking was, but figured it couldn’t be any worse than what I was doing, so I negotiated half days with my employer so I could attend classes. I quickly found that the course interested me and I seemed to be good at it.

Toward the end of the program, when I was researching employment opportunities, I noticed that the interesting and well-paying positions wanted UNIX experience. Having no idea what that was, and having no money as a poor student, I did an Internet search for “free UNIX.” The first hit was freebsd.org. I went to the website and my gut told me “this is it.” The rest, as they say, is history.

Doing the Robot, 21st-Century Style

Growing up in the 1970s, the first robot I remember was Rosie from The Jetsons. In the 1980s, I discovered Transformers, which were touted as “robots in disguise,” I imitated Michael Jackson’s version of “the robot,” and (unbeknownst to me) the Arthrobot surgical robot was first developed. This was years before Honda debuted ASIMO, the first humanoid robot, in 2004.

“In the 1970s, microprocessors gave me hope that real robots would eventually become part of our future,” RobotBASIC codeveloper John Blankenship told me in a 2013 interview. It appears that the “future” may already be here.

Honda's ASIMO humanoid robot

Honda’s ASIMO humanoid robot

Welcome to the 21st century. Technology is becoming “smarter,“ as evidenced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2014, which took place in January. The show unveiled a variety of smartphone-controlled robots and drones as well as wireless tracking devices.

Circuit Cellar’s columnists and contributors have been busy with their own developments. Steve Lubbers wondered if robots could be programmed to influence each other’s behavior. He used Texas Instruments’s LaunchPad hardware and a low-cost radio link to build a group of robots to test his theory. The results are on p. 18.

RobotBASIC’s Blankenship wanted to program robots more quickly. His article explains how he uses robot simulation to decrease development time (p. 30).

The Internet of Things (IoT), which relies on embedded technology for communication, is also making advancements. According to information technology research and advisory company Gartner, by 2020, there will be close to 26 billion devices on the IoT.

With the IoT, nothing is out of the realm of a designer’s imagination. For instance, if you’re not at home, you can use IoT-based platforms (such as the one columnist Jeff Bachiochi writes about on p. 58) to preheat your oven or turn off your sprinklers when it starts to rain.

Meanwhile, I will program my crockpot and try to explain to my 8-year-old how I survived childhood without the Internet.

Dynamic Efficiency Microcontrollers

STMicroThe STM32F401 Dynamic Efficiency microcontrollers extend battery life and support innovative new features in mobile phones, tablets, and smart watches. They help manage MEMS sensors in smart-connected devices and are well suited for Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications and fieldbus-powered industrial equipment.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers include an ART accelerator, a prefetch queue, and a branch cache. This enables zero-wait-state execution from flash, which boosts performance to 105 DMIPS (285 CoreMark) at 84 MHz. The microcontrollers’ 90-nm process technology boosts performance and reduces dynamic power. Its dynamic voltage scaling optimizes the operating voltage to meet performance demands and minimize leakage.

The STM32F401 microcontrollers integrate up to 512 KB of flash and 96 KB SRAM in a 3.06-mm × 3.06-mm chip-scale package and feature a 9-µA at 1.8 V Stop mode current. The devices’ peripherals include three 1-Mbps I2C ports, three USARTs, four SPI ports, two full-duplex I2S audio interfaces, a USB 2.0 OTG full-speed interface, an SDIO interface, 12-bit 2.4-MSPS 16-channel ADC, and up to 10 timers.

Pricing for the STM32F401 microcontrollers starts at $2.88 in 10,000-unit quantities.

STMicroelectronics
www.st.com

Industrial Temperature SBCs

EMACThe iPAC-9X25 embedded SBC is based on Atmel’s AT91SAM9X25 microprocessor. It is well suited for industrial temperature embedded data acquisition and control applications.
This web-enabled microcontroller can run an embedded server and display the current monitored or logged data. The web connection is available via two 10/100 Base-T Ethernet ports or 802.11 Wi-Fi networking. The iPAC-9X25’s connectors are brought out as headers on a board.

The SBC has a –40°C to 85°C industrial temperature range and utilizes 4 GB of eMMC flash, 16 MB of serial data flash (for boot), and 128 MB of DDR RAM. Its 3.77“ × 3.54“ footprint is the same as a standard PC/104 module.

The iPAC 9X25 features one RS-232 serial port with full handshake (RTS/CTS/DTR/DSR/RI), two RS-232 serial ports (TX and RX only), one RS-232/-422/-485 serial port with RTS/CTS handshake, two USB 2.0 host ports, and one USB device port. The board has seven channels of 12-bit audio/digital (0 to 3.3 V) and an internal real-time clock/calendar with battery backup. It also includes 21 GPIO (3.3-V) lines on header, eight high-drive open-collector dedicated digital output lines with configurable voltage tolerance, 16 GPIO (3.3 V) on header, two PWM I/O lines, five synchronous serial I/O lines (I2S), five SPI lines (two SPI CS), I2C bus, CAN bus, a microSD socket, external Reset button capabilities, and power and status LEDs.
The iPac-9X25 costs $198.

EMAC, Inc.
www.emacinc.com