Web-Based Remote I/O Control

The RIO-2010 is a web-based remote I/O control module. The Ethernet-ready module is equipped with eight relays, 16 photo-isolated digital inputs, and a 1-Wire interface for digital temperature sensor connection. The RIO-2010’s built-in web server enables you to access the I/O and use a standard web browser to remotely control the RIO-2010’s relay.

The RIO-2010 can be easily integrated into supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and industrial automation systems using the standard Modbus TCP protocol. The I/O module also comes with RS-485 serial interface for applications requiring Modbus RTU/ASCII. Its built-in web server enables you to use standard web-editing tools and Ajax dynamic page technology to customize your webpage.

Contact Artila for pricing.

Artila Electronics Co., Ltd.
www.artila.com

A Well-Organized Workspace for Home Automation Systems

Organization and plenty of space to work on projects are the main elements of Dean Boman’s workspace (see Photo 1). Boman, a retired systems engineer, says most of his projects involve home automation. He described some of his workspace features via e-mail:

My test equipment suite consists of a Rigol digital oscilloscope, a triple-output power supply, various single-output power supplies, and several Microchip Technology in-circuit development tools.

I have also built a simple logic analyzer, an FPGA programmer, and an EPROM programmer. For PCB fabrication, I have a complete setup from MG Chemicals to expose, develop, etch, and plate boards up to about 6” × 9” in size.

Photo 1: Boman’s workbench includes overhead cabinets to help reduce clutter. The computer in the foreground is his web server and main home-automation system controller. (Source: D. Boman)

Photo 1: Boman’s workbench includes overhead cabinets to help reduce clutter. The computer in the foreground is his web server and main home-automation system controller. (Source: D. Boman)

Boman is currently troubleshooting a small 1-W ham radio transmitter (see Photo 2).

Photo 2: Boman is currently troubleshooting a small 1-W ham radio transmitter (Source: D. Boman)

Photo 2: Here is his workbench with the radio transmitter. (Source: D. Boman)

Boman says the 10’ long countertop surface (in the background in Photo 3) is:

Great for working on larger items (e.g., computers). It is also a great surface for debugging designs as you have plenty of room for test equipment, drawings, and datasheets.

Photo 3: Boman’s setup includes plenty of spacefor large projects. (Source: D. Boman)

Photo 3: Boman’s setup includes plenty of room for large projects. (Source: D. Boman)

Most of Boman’s projects involve in-home automation (see Photo 4).

My current system provides functions such as: security system monitoring, irrigation control, water leak detection, temperature monitoring, electrical usage monitoring, fire detection, access control, weather monitoring, water usage monitoring, solar hot water system control, and security video recording. I also have an Extra Class ham radio license (WE7J) and build some ham radio equipment.

Here is how he described his system setup:

The shelf on the top contains the network routers and the security system. The cabinets on the wall contain an irrigation system controller and a network monitor for network management. I was fortunate in that we built a custom home a few years ago so I was able to run about two miles of cabling in the walls during construction.

Photo 4: Boman has various elements of his home-automation control system mounted on the wall. (Source: D. Boman)

Photo 4: Boman has various elements of his home-automation control system mounted on the wall. (Source: D. Boman)

Boman uses small containers to hold an inventory of surface-mount components (see Photo 5).

Over the past 10 years or so I have migrated to doing surface-mount designs almost exclusively. I have found that once you get over the learning curve, the surface-mount designs are much simpler to design and troubleshoot then the through-hole type technology. The printed wiring boards are also much simpler to fabricate, which is important since I etch my own boards.

Photo 5: Surface-mount components are neatly corralled in containers. (Source: D. Boman)

Photo 5: Surface-mount components are neatly corralled in containers. (Source: D. Boman)

Overall, Boman’s setup is well suited to his interests. He keeps everything handy in well-organized containers and has plenty of testing space In addition, his custom-built home enabled him to run behind-the-scenes cabling, freeing up valuable workspace.

Do you want to share images of your workspace, hackspace, or “circuit cellar”? Send your images and space info to editor<at>circuitcellar.com.

DC Motor for Fine Rotary Motions

The RE 30 EB precious metal brushed motor features a low start-up voltage, even after a long period in standstill. With a 53-mNm rated torque, the powerful motor provides twice the power of an Maxon RE 25 EB. In addition, the RE 30 EB features minimal high-frequency interference.

The RE 30 EB motor is specifically designed for haptic applications (e.g., surgical robots). Therefore, the motor can also be used as a highly sensitive sensor, acting as the sense of touch to register mechanical resistance.

Contact Maxon for pricing.

Maxon Precision Motors
www.maxonmotorusa.com

Q&A: Peter Lomas – Raspberry Pi: One Year Later, 1 Million Sold

Peter Lomas

Clemens Valens, Editor-in-Chief of Elektor Online and head of Elektor Labs, caught up with Peter Lomas, hardware designer for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer, earlier this year at the Embedded World 2013 trade show in Nuremberg, Germany. This is a longer version of an interview with Lomas published in Elektor’s May 2013 issue. The Lomas interview provided a one-year update on the rapid growth of interest in the Raspberry Pi since Elektor’s April 2012 interview with Eben Upton, one of the founders and trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The UK-based charitable foundation developed the inexpensive, credit card-sized computer to encourage the study of basic computer science in schools. In early 2012, the Raspberry Pi’s first production batches were arriving. Since then, more than 1 million boards have been sold.

CLEMENS: Raspberry Pi, the phenomena. It is quite amazing what happened.

PETER: It is, and lots of people keep asking me, why has Raspberry Pi done what it has done, what makes it different? I think it’s something we’ve really been trying to grasp. The first thing that happened with Raspberry Pi, which I think is important, is that we had one of our very first prototypes on a UK blog for one of the BBC correspondents, Rory Cellan-Jones, and they made a little video, a YouTube video, and that got 600,000 hits. So I guess that if you look at it from one aspect, that created a viral marketing, a very viral marketing campaign for Raspberry Pi. The other I think, the name, Raspberry Pi was key. And the logo that Paul Beach did for us is absolutely key because it has become iconic.

CLEMENS: Yes, it’s very recognizable.

PETER: Very recognizable. If I show you that, you know exactly what it is, in the electronics circle. So I think the brand has been very important. But you know, we shouldn’t forget the amount of work that Liz Upton’s been doing with the blogs and on our website, keeping people informed about what we’re doing. Then, I think we’ve got the fact we are a charity… that we are focused on the education of computing and electronics and that’s our motive—not actually to make boards and to make money except to fund the foundation.

CLEMENS: I looked at the Raspberry Pi website, and it doesn’t look easy to me. You target education, children, and on the website it’s hard to find what Raspberry Pi exactly is. It’s not really explained. You have to know it. There are several distributions, so you have to know Linux and you have to program in Python.

PETER: Well, that’s true and, in a weird way, that’s part of its success, because you actually have to be active. In order to do something with Pi, you can’t just get it out of a shiny box, put it on the desk and press “on.” You have to do some mental work. You have to figure some things out. Now, I actually think that there’s a bit of a benefit there, because when it actually works, you have some achievement. You’ve done something. Not “we’ve done something.” You’ve done it personally, and there is a gratification from doing it.

CLEMENS: But it’s not the easiest platform.

PETER: No, but with our educational proposition, the whole object now is to package that up in easier-to-use bundles. We can make the SD card boot straight to Scratch (a website project and simple programming language developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab), so Linux becomes temporarily invisible, and there’s a set of worksheets and instructions. But we’re never going to take away, hopefully, the fact that you have to put your wires in, and I do think that is part of the importance and the attraction of it.

CLEMENS: Because of all these layers of complexity and having to program it in English (Python is in English), for the non-English population it is yet another hurdle. That’s why Arduino was so successful; they made the programming really easy. They had cheap hardware but also a way to easily program it.

PETER: There’s no doubt Arduino is a brilliant product. You are right, it enables people to get to what I call “Hello World” very easily. But, in fact, on a Raspberry Pi, after you’ve made those connections and plugged the card in, you can get to an equivalent “Hello World.” But ours is the Scratch cat. Once you’ve moved the Scratch cat, you can go in a few different directions: you can move it some more, or you can use Scratch with an I/O interface to make an LED light up or you can press a button to make the Scratch cat move. There are endless directions you can go. I’ve found, and I think Eben has similarly experienced, that kids just get it. As long as you don’t make it too complicated, the kids just get it. It’s the adults who have more problems.

CLEMENS: I saw that there are at least three different distributions for the boards. So what are the differences between the three? Why isn’t there just one?

PETER: Well, they all offer subtly different features. The whole idea was to make Raspberry Pi as an undergraduate tool. You give it to Cambridge University, hopefully Manchester University, and undergraduates can view the science before they start it. They have the summer. They can work on it, come back, and say: “Look, I did this on this board.” That’s where it all started.

CLEMENS: OK. So, you were already on quite a high level.

PETER: Well we were on a high level, that’s true. We were on a high level, so Scratch wouldn’t have been on the agenda. It was really just Python—that’s actually where the Pi comes from.
What has really happened is that we’ve developed this community and this ecosystem around Pi. So we have to be able to support the, if you like, “different roots” of people wanting to use Pi. Now we’ve got the RISC OS that you can use. And people are even doing bare-metal programming. If we just gave one distribution, I guess we’re closing it up. I fully approve of having different distributions.

CLEMENS: From the website, it’s not clear to me what is different in these distributions. For the first one, it is written: “If you’re just starting out.”

PETER: I think maybe we do need to put some more material in there to explain to people the difference. I have to explain: I’m the hardware guy. I’m the guy who sat there connecting the tracks up, connecting the components up. My expertise with the operating systems, with the distributions that we have, is really limited to the graphical interface because that’s what I use day in, day out.

CLEMENS: Once you have chosen your distribution and you want to control an LED, you have to open a driver or something, I suppose?

PETER: Well, you’ve got the library; you just have to make a library call. Again, it’s not easy. You have to go and find the libraries and you have to download them. Which is where things such as the Pi-Face (add-on board) come in, because that comes with an interactive library that will go onto Scratch. And you’ve got the Gertboard (another extension board) and that comes with the libraries to drive it and some tutorial examples and then you can wind that back to just the bare metal interface on the GPIOs.

CLEMENS: So the simplicity is now coming from the add-on boards?

PETER: Some of the add-on boards can make it simpler, where they give you the switches and they give you the LEDs. You don’t need to do any wiring. My view is that I’m trying to make it like an onion: You can start with the surface and you can do something, and then you can peel away the layers. The more interested you get, the more layers you can peel away and the more different directions you can go (in what you do with it). You must have seen the diverse things that can be done.

CLEMENS: I’ve looked at some projects. I was surprised by the number of media centers. That’s how RS Components (which distributes the Raspberry Pi) is promoting the board. Aren’t you disappointed with that? It seems to be, for a lot of people, a cheap platform to do a Linux application on. They just want to have a media center.

PETER: I know exactly what you mean. And I suppose I should be disappointed that some people buy it, they make it into a media center, and that’s all it does. But I think if only 5% or 10% of those people who make it into a media center will think: “Well, that was easy, maybe I’ll get another and see if I can do something else with it,” then it’s a success.

CLEMENS: It would be an enabler.

PETER: Getting the technology in front of people is the first problem. Getting the “Hello World” so they’ve got a sense of achievement is the second problem. Then turning them over from doing that to “Okay, well what if I try and do this?”  then that’s  Nirvana. Certainly for the kids that’s crucial, because we’re changing them from doing what they’re told, to start doing things that they think they might be able to do—and trying it. That makes them into engineers.

CLEMENS: Let’s move on to the board’s hardware.

PETER: Sure.

CLEMENS: So, you chose a Broadcom processor. Because Eben worked at Broadcom?

PETER: He still works within Broadcom. It would be hard for me to argue that that wasn’t an influence on the decision, because Eben said: “Oh look, here’s the bright shiny chip. It can do all the things that we want, why wouldn’t we use it?” The decision we made is we nailed our credentials and our reputations to the website by saying it will cost $35—it will cost $25 for the basic one. And there was no way on Earth any of us were going to go back on that… We had a spreadsheet, the basic numbers looked plausible, we just had to do a lot of work to chop it down—to hone it, to get it tight so it would actually meet the prices. So, I think if we’d gone another way, like maybe with Samsung, that would have blown the budget.

CLEMENS: Did Broadcom help in any way to make this possible?

PETER: Every semiconductor manufacturer helped the project by making the chips available. Also, the price point of the chips is important. I think some of the people who helped us took an educated gamble and gave us good pricing from day one. Because the big problem you get with trying to bootstrap any project, is that if you don’t know what your volume is going to be. You have to be conservative.

So, initially, we priced for a thousand boards, but quickly we priced for 20,000 boards, but nowhere in our wildest dreams did we think we were going to get to a 200,000-board requirement on launch day and be so tantalizingly close to selling a million after our first year. So that’s helped in a lot of ways, because obviously it’s driven the price of all the components down. I’m not going to pretend it doesn’t please the vendors of the components that had faith in us from day one, because they’ve obviously made some money out of it.

We always had the rationale that we had to have a sustainable model where the foundation, our community that is buying the boards, and our suppliers were all making a living and could feed themselves. It would have been a total disaster if someone such as Broadcom had said: “Tell you what guys, let’s give you the processors. We’ll give you the first 20,000.” And so, we could have provided all sorts of extra bells and whistles to the design. Then, when we would have sold these 20,000 boards, we’re going to raise the price of everything by $12. That would’ve been the end of Raspberry Pi.

CLEMENS: If Eben and the others had not worked for Broadcom…

PETER: Would we have used a different chip? Well, I sort of speculated about this and I went around and had a look and, at the time for the price point, we couldn’t find anything that would’ve met our requirements as well as that chip. So I was comfortable that was the one that would allow us to get to where we wanted to be, and I think the big key crunch for that was the high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI). From a technical point of view, one of the challenges we had was getting the breakout under the BGA, because blind and buried vias on PCBs are very expensive.

CLEMENS: How many layers is the board?

PETER: Six, which is a pretty bog-standard layer count. The only little trick that we used was to put blind vias only on layers one and two—so we had an extra drilling stage—but only one bonding stage. So that added $0.02 onto the cost of the board. But, because the next layer down was a ground plane, it meant that a lot of the connections that come out of the Broadcom processor just go down one layer. And that meant that I could have space underneath to route other things and actually make it all happen.

CLEMENS: Don’t they have guidelines at Broadcom?

PETER: Oh, they do have guidelines! Use blind and buried vias or vias in pads. Our first prototype was all singing, all dancing, but it would have cost $100 to $110 to manufacture. So we got the machete out and started hacking down all the things that we didn’t need. So you’ve got all the functionality that you want. You can get the performance that you want, you can get the compliance, but it’s got nothing extra.

CLEMENS: Have you been thinking about the future of Raspberry Pi?

PETER: Well, yeah… In our industry, you know, Moore’s law guarantees that everything is old-hat in two years’ time. So we’re thinking about it, but that’s all we’re doing. We’re trying to improve our educational release. I mean, let’s face it, I’m not going to pretend that the Raspberry Pi is perfect. We only made one modification to the board from design to release. We’ve only made some minor modifications under the V2 release. Some of that is to fix some anomalies, some of that was also to help our new manufacturing partner, Sony (in Pencoed, Wales), take it. Their process needed some slight changes to the board to make it easier to manufacture.

CLEMENS: About the original idea of Raspberry Pi, the educational thing. I had a look at the forum and there are lots of forums about technical details, quite a lot of questions and topics about start-up problems. But the educational forum is pretty small.

PETER: You’re right. You’re absolutely right. A lot of that work has been going on slowly and carefully in the background. To be completely honest with you, we were caught on the hub with the interest with Raspberry Pi, and so I’ve certainly spent the last 12 months making sure that we can deliver the product to our community so that they can develop with it and perhaps talk a little bit about our educational goals. But we’re absolutely refocusing on that.

CLEMENS: First, get the hardware into people’s hands and then focus on the education.

PETER: Exactly. And of course, we’ve also released the first computers in schools as manual teaching tools. But also we’ve got Clive, who is a full-time employee helping with the educational deployment. And it’s great that we’ve had all this support (from Google Giving) to get 15,000 kits into schools. I won’t pretend we don’t have a lot of work to do but, I think of where we were a year ago, just still trying to launch.

CLEMENS: It all went really fast.

PETER: Oh yes, it’s gone like a rocket!

CLEMENS: Have you personally learned something valuable from it?

PETER: Well, I’ve learned lots of things. I think the most valuable, maybe not a lesson, but a reinforcement of something I already thought, is that education doesn’t just exist in the classroom. It exists all around us. The opportunity to learn and the opportunity to teach exists every day in almost every aspect in what we do. You know, there are people who spend their lives trying to keep every secret, keep everything to themselves. But there are also people who just give. And I’ve met so many people who are just givers. I suppose I’ve learned there is a whole new system of education that goes on outside of the standard curriculum that helps people do what they want to do.

Editor’s Note: Interview by Clemens Valens, Transcription by Joshua Walbey.

RESOURCES

  • Embedded Linux Wiki, “RPi Gertboard,” elinux.org/RPi_Gertboard
  • W. Hettinga, “What Are You Doing? The Raspberry Pi $25 Computer,” Elektor April 2012.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, “Scratch,” scratch.mit.edu
  • University of Manchester School of Computer Science, Projects Using Raspberry Pi, “Pi-Face Digital Interface,” http://pi.cs.man.ac.uk/interface.htm

 

Dual-Display Digital Multimeter

The DM3058E digital multimeter (DMM) is designed with 5.5-digit resolution and dual display. The DMM can enable system integration and is suitable for high-precision, multifunction, and automatic measurement applications.

The DM3058E is capable of measuring up to 123 readings per second. It can quickly save or recall up to 10 preset configurations, including built-in cold terminal compensation for thermocouples.

The DMM provides a convenient and flexible platform with an easy-to-use design and a built-in help system for information acquisition. In addition, it supports 10 different measurement types including DC voltage (200 mV to approximately 1,000 V), AC voltage (200 mV to approximately 750 V), DC current (200 µA to approximately
10 A), AC current (20 mA to approximately 10 A), frequency measurement (20 Hz to approximately 1 MHz), 2-Wire and 4-Wire resistance (200 O to approximately 100 MO), and diode, continuity, and capacitance.

The DM3058 is ideal for research and development labs and educational applications, as well as low-end detection, maintenance, and quality tests where automation combined with capability and value are needed.

The DM3058E digital multimeter costs $449.

Rigol Technologies, Inc.
www.rigolna.com

SMTA Accepting Registration for Conference and Exhibition

Surface Mount Circuit BoardThe Surface Mount Technology Association has finalized its program for the  SMTA International Conference and Exhibition (SMTA Internationial) to be held October 13-17, 2013, in Fort Worth, TX.

The SMTA is an international network of professionals who build skills, share knowledge and develop solutions in electronic assembly technologies, including microsystems, emerging technologies and related business operations, according to its website.

Recently,  the SMTA announced an agreement to co-locate SMTA International  with the IPC Fall Standards Development Committee meetings for 2013, 2014, and 2015. SMTA International will be held October 13-17, 2013, and the IPC Fall Standards Development Committee meetings will be held October 12-17, 2013 at the Fort Worth Convention Center.

“I am pleased to welcome IPC standards activities to our International Technical Conference and Exhibition,” SMTA President Bill Barthel said. “We see the leading edge technology and the all-important standards development as a great combination for attendees.”

SMTA International provides the latest research to help reduce defects and control processes, according to the organization’s website.

“This year, we are offering a new symposium on Counterfeit Electronics, expanding the Harsh Environments Symposium, and offering new tutorials including “Design for Reliability for PCBs,” which is free for members,” the website says.

The conference portion of SMTA International is October 13-17, 2013, and exhibition takes place October 15-16, 2013.

Early bird registration ends Friday, Sept. 13. For more details and to register, visit the SMTA website, www.smta.org.

Andrew Boelbaai Wins the CC Code Challenge (Week 12)

We have a winner of last week’s CC Weekly Code Challenge, sponsored by IAR Systems! We posted a code snippet with an error and challenged the engineering community to find the mistake!

Congratulations to Andrew Boelbaai of Sugar Land, Texas, United States for winning the CC Weekly Code Challenge for Week 121! Andrew will receive the Elektor 2011 & 2012 Archive DVD.

Andrew’s correct answer was randomly selected from the pool of responses that correctly identified an error in the code. Andrew answered:

Line 10: J is not incrementing and causing an infinite loop. Must be for(j=0; j<count; sum += data[j++])

 

You can see the complete list of weekly winners and code challenges here.

What is the CC Weekly Code Challenge?
Each week, Circuit Cellar’s technical editors purposely insert an error in a snippet of code. It could be a semantic error, a syntax error, a design error, a spelling error, or another bug the editors slip in. You are challenged to find the error.Once the submission deadline passes, Circuit Cellar will randomly select one winner from the group of respondents who submit the correct answer.

Inspired? Want to try this week’s challenge? Get started!

Submission Deadline: The deadline for each week’s challenge is Sunday, 12 PM ESTRefer to the Rules, Terms & Conditions for information about eligibility and prizes.

Two-Channel CW Laser Diode Driver with an MCU Interface

The iC-HT laser diode driver enables microcontroller-based activation of laser diodes in Continuous Wave mode. With this device, laser diodes can be driven by the optical output power (using APC), the laser diode current (using ACC), or a full controller-based power control unit.

The maximum laser diode current per channel is 750 mA. Both channels can be switched in parallel for high laser diode currents of up to 1.5 A. A current limit can also be configured for each channel.

Internal operating points and voltages can be output through ADCs. The integrated temperature sensor enables the system temperature to be monitored and can also be used to analyze control circuit feedback. Logarithmic DACs enable optimum power regulation across a large dynamic range. Therefore, a variety of laser diodes can be used.

The relevant configuration is stored in two equivalent memory areas. Internal current limits, a supply-voltage monitor, channel-specific interrupt-switching inputs, and a watchdog safeguard the laser diodes’ operation through iC-HT.

The device can be also operated by pin configuration in place of the SPI or I2C interface, where external resistors define the APC performance targets. An external supply voltage can be controlled through current output device configuration overlay (DCO) to reduce the system power dissipation (e.g., in battery-operated devices or systems).

The iC-HT operates on 2.8 to 8 V and can drive both blue and green laser diodes. The diode driver has a –40°C-to-125°C operating temperature range and is housed in a 5-mm × 5-mm, 28-pin QFN package.

The iC-HT costs $13.20 in 1,000-unit quantities.

iC-Haus GmbH
www.ichaus.com

Low-Cost, High-Performance 32-bit Microcontrollers

The PIC32MX3/4 32-bit microcontrollers are available in 64/16-, 256/64-, and 512/128-KB flash/RAM configurations. The microcontrollers are coupled with Microchip Technology’s software and tools for designs in connectivity, graphics, digital audio, and general-purpose embedded control.

The microcontrollers offer high RAM memory options and high peripheral integration at a low cost. They feature 28 10-bit ADCs, five UARTS, 105-DMIPS performance, serial peripherals, a graphic display, capacitive touch, connectivity, and digital audio support.
The PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers are supported with general software development tools, including Microchip Technology’s MPLAB X integrated development environment (IDE) and the MPLAB XC32 C/C++ compiler.

Application-specific tools include the Microchip Graphics Display Designer X and the Microchip Graphics Library, which provide a visual design tool that enables quick and easy creation of graphical user interface (GUI) screens for applications. The microcontrollers are also supported with a set of Microchip’s protocol stacks including TCP/IP, USB Device and Host, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. For digital audio applications, Microchip provides software for tasks such as sample rate conversion (SRC), audio codecs—including MP3 and Advanced Audio Coding (AAC), and software to connect smartphones and other personal electronic devices.

The PIC32MX3/4 family is supported by Microchip’s PIC32 USB Starter Kit III, which costs $59.99 and the PIC32MX450 100-pin USB plug-in module, which costs $25 for the modular Explorer 16 development system. Pricing for the PIC32MX3/4 microcontrollers starts at $2.50 each in 10,000-unit quantities.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
www.microchip.com

Low-Power, High-Efficiency Boost Regulator

The TS3300 is an ultra-low-power, load-independent, high-efficiency boost regulator. It operates from supply voltages as low as 0.6 up to 4.5 V and can deliver at least 75 mA of continuous output current.

The TS3300 can be powered from a variety of power sources including single- or multiple-cell alkaline or single Li-chemistry batteries. The boost regulator’s output voltage range can be user-specified from 1.8 to 5.25 V to simultaneously power a range of low-power analog circuits, microcontrollers, and low-energy Bluetooth radios. The TS3300 produces a 3-V output from a 1.2-V input source. Its efficiency performance is constant over a 100:1 span in output current. To power low-energy radios, the TS3300’s internal, low-dropout linear regulator can deliver up to 100 mA output current while reducing boost-converter-generated output voltage ripple.

Drawing only 3.5 µA no-load supply current, the TS3300 is ideal for “always on” and other battery-powered or portable applications where an extended battery run-time is required. The TS3300 operates from low power sources (e.g., photovoltaic cells to three alkaline cells) and is ideally suited for handheld/portable applications (e.g., wireless remote sensors, RFID tags, wireless microphones, solar cell post-regulator/chargers, post-regulators for energy harvesting, blood glucose meters, and personal health-monitoring devices).

The TS3300 is fully specified over the –40°C-to-85°C temperature range and is available in a low-profile, thermally-enhanced 16-pin 3mm × 3mm TQFN package with an exposed backside paddle. The TS3300 costs $0.85 in 1,000-unit quantities.

Touchstone Semiconductor
http://touchstonesemi.com

Member Profile: Steve Hendrix

Steve Hendrix

Location: Sagamore Hills, OH (located between Cleveland and Akron)

Education: BS, United States Air Force Academy, El Paso County, CO

Occupation: Steve began moonlighting as an engineering consultant in 1979. He has been a full-time consultant since 1992.

Member Status: He says he has been a subscriber since “forever.” He remembers reading the Circuit Cellar columns in Byte magazine.

Technical Interests: Steve enjoys embedded design, from picoamps to kiloamps, from nanovolts to kilovolts, from microhertz to gigahertz, and from nanowatts to kilowatts.
Current Projects: He is working on eight active professional projects. Most of his projects involve embedding Microchip Technology’s PIC18 microcontroller family.

Some of Steve’s projects include Texas Instruments Bluetooth processors and span all the previously mentioned ranges in the interfacing hardware. Steve says he is also working on a personal project involving solar photovoltaic power.

Thoughts on the Future of Embedded Technology: Steve thinks of embedded technology as “a delicate balancing act: time spent getting the technology set up vs. time we would spend to do the same job manually; convenience and connectivity vs. privacy, time, and power saved vs. energy consumed; time developing the technology vs. its payoffs; and connectedness with people far away vs. with those right around us.” Additionally, he says there are always the traditional three things to balance “good, fast, cheap—choose two!”

Accurate Measurement Power Analyzer

The PA4000 power analyzer provides accurate power measurements. It offers one to four input modules, built-in test modes, and standard PC interfaces.

The analyzer features innovative Spiral Shunt technology that enables you to lock onto complex signals. The Spiral Shunt design ensures stable, linear response over a range of input current levels, ambient temperatures, crest factors, and other variables. The spiral construction minimizes stray inductance (for optimum high-frequency performance) and provides high overload capability and improved thermal stability.

The PA4000’s additional features include 0.04% basic voltage and current accuracy, dual internal current shunts for optimal resolution, frequency detection algorithms for noisy waveform tracking, application-specific test modes to simplify setup. The analyzer  easily exports data to a USB flash drive or PC software. Harmonic analysis and communications ports are included as standard features.

Contact Tektronix for pricing.

Tektronix, Inc.
www.tek.com

Industrial Double-Break Switch for IP67/68

The MP220 is an industrial high-current switch. It features a single-pole, double-break electrical circuit that enables it to double break two independent electrical circuits.

The MP220 switch utilizes a fast snap action mechanism to transition from break-to-make position. The switch in its standard version is currently IP67 sealed. An improved sealing for IP68 applications with a strengthened cable exit is also available.

The MP220 is available in standard microswitch-size housing with a range of possible actuators and a four-wire potted cable. The switch is EN61058-certified for 250 VAC/10 A with a –40°C-to-130°C operating temperature range.

Contact Microprecision for pricing.

Microprecision Electronics SA
www.microprecision.ch

CC278: New Issue, New Look, New Media

Over the years, Circuit Cellar editors have learned you simply can’t stand still when your magazine focuses on ever-evolving embedded electronics. So with the September issue, we introduce a dramatic redesign to make the magazine’s look more contemporary and its connection with our website stronger.

The heart of our content is still project pieces and columns. For example, in this issue, Nelson Epp writes about a Rubik’s Cube-solving robot (p. 24), Walter Krawec examines evolving neural networks in robotics (p. 42), and Brian Millier describes how to configure his “Iso-Pi” I/0 board for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer (p. 32).

In addition, our column topics include examining different battery types and their characteristics (p. 48), exploring commodity LED characteristics with a stress tester and an optical output detector (p. 54), and understanding BMP graphical file formats (p. 64).

Speaking of columnists, the September issue introduces a new one—Ayse Coskun, a Boston University assistant professor. Her bimonthly Green Computing column will focus on topics that recognize energy is a “first-order constraint” on any computing system, large or small. So she will be looking at everything from energy-efficient software and hardware-design strategies to electricity cost savings and battery-life extension (p. 60).

Another new feature is CC World (p. 8), which will provide monthly updates on topics of interest to the magazine’s international community of engineers, academics, and students. This month, we touch on the CC Weekly Code Challenge and the designers participating in Elektor-LABS.com, the lab-tested, project-sharing site provided by Elektor International Media (EIM).

But our changes are not simply about what you see on the magazine’s pages. This redesign makes it easier for you to connect our print content to related material at circuitcellar.com.

At the end of each article, you’ll discover an easier way to find project files and supporting documents online. You can either type circuitcellar.com/ccmaterials in your browser or use your smartphone to scan the printed QR code.

We hope you enjoy the new look and conveniences.

Data Acquisition Instrument

The DI-145 USB data acquisition instrument features four ±100-V analog channels and two dedicated digital inputs. The included DATAQ WinDaq data acquisition software (DAS) enables you to display and record data to a PC hard drive in real time. Once recorded, data can be played back, analyzed, or exported to an array of data acquisition and spreadsheet formats.

DATAQ also provides access to the DI-145 data protocol, which enables access to the DI-145 on any Windows, Linux, or MAC OS. In addition, .NET control is available to Windows users who wish to use a third-party programming language (e.g., Microsoft’s Visual Basic or National Instruments’s LabVIEW) to interface with the DI-145.

The four ±10-V fixed differential channels are protected from transient spikes up to ±150 V peak (±75 V, continuous). A 10-bit ADC provides 19.5-mV resolution across the full-scale measurement range. Digital inputs are protected up to ±30 VDC/peak AC. The digital inputs enable you to use a switch closure or TTL signal to remotely insert event marks or record data to disk.

The DI-145 measures 1.53” × 2.625” × 5.5” (3.89 cm × 6.67 cm × 13.97 cm) and weighs 3.6 oz. The data acquisition instrument costs $29 and includes a mini screwdriver, a USB cable, WinDaq/Lite DAS, access to the data protocol, and .NET control.

DATAQ Instruments, Inc.
www.dataq.com