DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge 2012 Winners Named

The results for the DesignSpark chipKIT Challenge are now final. Dean Boman won First Prize for his chipKIT-based Energy Monitoring System, which provides users real-time home electrical usage data. A web server provides usage tracking on a circuit-by-circuit basis. It interfaces with a home automation system for long-term monitoring and data logging.

Dean Boman's Energy Monitoring System (Source: D. Boman)

Second prize went to Raul Alvarez for his Home Energy Gateway consumption monitor, which features an embedded gateway/web server that communicates with “smart” devices.

Raul Alvarezs Home Energy Gateway (Source: R. Alvarez)

Graig Pearen won Third Prize for his PV Array Tracker (Sun Seeker) project, which tracks, monitors, and adjusts PV arrays based on weather conditions.

Graig Pearen's PV Array Tracker (Source: G. Pearen)

Click HERE for a list of all the winners. You can review their project abstracts, documentation, schematics, diagrams, code, and more.

Participants in the competition were challenged develop innovative, energy-efficient designs with eco-friendly footprints. Entries were required to include an extension card developed using the DesignSpark PCB software tool and the Microchip Max32 chipKIT development board.

According to the documentation on the design challenge site:

The chipKIT™ Max32™ development platform is a 32-bit Arduino solution that enables hobbyists and academics to easily and inexpensively integrate electronics into their projects, even if they do not have an electronic-engineering background.

The platform consists of two PIC32-based development boards and open-source software that is compatible with the Arduino programming language and development environment. The chipKIT™ hardware is compatible with existing 3.3V Arduino shields and applications, and can be developed using a modified version of the Arduino IDE and existing Arduino resources, such as code examples, libraries, references and tutorials.

The chipKIT™ Basic I/O Shield (part # TDGL005) is compatible with the chipKIT™ Max32™ board, and offers users simple push buttons, switches, LEDs, I2C™ EEPROM, I2C temperature sensor, and a 128 x 32 pixel organic LED graphic display.

 

Click HERE for a list of all the winners. You can review their project abstracts, documentation, schematics, diagrams, code, and more.

Circuit Cellar/Elektor Inc. is the Contest Administrator.

Elektor Weekly Wrap-Up: “Elektor Projects” Site, Arduino Webinar, & Special Issue Prep

It’s been a remarkable week for Elektor International Media. Staffers launched a new community site, announced an upcoming Android-related webinar, and worked with U.S.-based colleagues to plan Circuit Cellar’s 25th anniversary special edition.

Elektor Projects Community Site

Elektor announced this week of a new community website—Elektor Projects—for “Elektor Plus” members. Elektor Projects is a site where members can share electronics experiences, read about designs, and participate in electronics projects, games, and challenges. Check it out at www.elektor-projects.com.

Elektor's new community website, Elektor-Projects.com

The site enables members to:

  • Present projects and get published in Elektor magazine
  • Sell products through the web shop
  • Build a reputation by showing of your skills in projects, contributions, comments, games and contests.

Click here to join the site!

Elektor staff celebrated the launch of Elektor Projects with a special cake. Any beer to go with it?

Webninar: Arduino Controlled by LabVIEW

Elektor announced Wednesday it is teaming up with element14 to deliver a webinar on connecting Arduino and LabVIEW using LIFA.

Arduino and LabVIEW are handy programming environments for designers of all levels, especially those who do not know how to program (or don’t want to). Both platforms enable rapid application development.

In this webinar Elektor editor Clemens Valens will cover how to get start with LabVIEW and LIFA. He’ll detail how to develop a virtual instrument to blink the LED on Elektor’s Arduino-compatible board called Platino.

In addition, Valens will cover LIFA, add a custom relay board, and replace the USB cable by a Bluetooth connection to the PC. In the end, users will be able to wirelessly monitor the status of the Arduino/Platino/Relay system on an iPad or Android tablet anywhere in the world.

Webinar: Arduino Controlled by LabVIEW
Date: Thursday, May 24, 2012
Time: 15:00 GMT (16:00 CET)
Presenter: Clemens Valens (Elektor Contributing Editor)
Language: English

Click here to register for the webinar.

25 Year Anniversary Issue

Elektor Director Don Akkermans met with Elektor US and Circuit Cellar staff in Connecticut this week to discuss the various exciting endeavors on tap for the rest of 2012 and beyond.

One particularly exciting development under discussion was Circuit Cellar’s 25th Anniversary Special! We’re planning an amazing 25th anniversary edition of Circuit Cellar, with essays by columnists and industry leaders on the past, present, and future of embedded design, programming, and computer technology. Elektor staffers will be among the contributors.

Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks about this must-have collector’s item!

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor group publication.

EAGLE Design Challenge: Design the Next Innovation for Microchip in EAGLE V6

CadSoft and Premier Farnell announced recently the start of the EAGLE Design Challenge, which will run until August 31, 2012. Design engineers can submit design projects for a shot at winning prizes with an overall value of around $7,000.

The competition is powered by Microchip and hosted on element14. Elektor and Circuit Cellar are acting as media partners.

Participation

To participate, applicants must ensure that all designs use EAGLE Version 6 and that a Microchip MCU or DSC will be integrated in the design.

After registering at element14, you can submit a screenshot of your layout and add a project description on the competition page.

If you don’t have an EAGLE license and want to participate in the contest, you can download a free 30-days trial version at www.element14.com/eagle-freemium.

Judging

The competition will feature peer voting from the element14 community. Community members “like” entries and submit comments.

A panel of judges—consisting of CadSoft, Premier Farnell and Microchip representatives along with independent EAGLE expert Prof. Dr. Francesco Volpe from the University of Applied Sciences in Aschaffenburg—will pick the winners based on the “likes” and comments from community members. According to the rules, “judging criteria include clarity in description of the submission, its electronic concept, design complexity, design quality, and functionality.”

Prizes

1. DELL Alienware M17x r3 + EAGLE version 6 Professional incl. all three modules.

2. MICROCHIP DV164037 Kit, Eval, ICD3 w/ Explorer-16 & DM163022-1 8-Bit development board + EAGLE Version 6 Professional incl. all three modules.

3. EAGLE Version 6 Standard incl. all three modules.

Visit www.element14.com/eagle-competition for more details as well as the terms and conditions.

 

 

“Robocup” Soccer: Robot Designs Compete in Soccer Matches

Roboticists and soccer fans from around the world converged on Eindhoven, The Netherlands, from April 25–29 for the Roboup Dutch Open. The event was an interesting combination of sports and electronics engineering.

Soccer action at the Robocup Dutch Open

Since I have dozens of colleagues based in The Netherlands, I decided to see if someone would provide event coverage for our readers and members. Fortunately, TechtheFuture.com’s Tessel Rensenbrink was available and willing to cover the event. She reports:

Attending the Robocup Dutch Open is like taking a peek into the future. Teams of fully autonomous robots compete with each other in a soccer game. The matches are as engaging as watching humans compete in sports and the teams even display particular characteristics. The German bots suck at penalties and the Iranian bots are a rough bunch frequently body checking their opponents.

The Dutch Open was held in Eindhoven, The Netherlands from the 25th to the 29th of April. It is part of Robocup, a worldwide educational initiative aiming to promote robotics and artificial intelligence research. The soccer tournaments serve as a test bed for developments in robotics and help raise the interest of the general public. All new discoveries and techniques are shared across the teams to support rapid development.
The ultimate goal is to have a fully autonomous humanoid robot soccer team defeat the winner of the World Cup of Human Soccer in 2050.

In Eindhoven the competition was between teams from the Middle Size Robot League. The bots are 80 cm (2.6 ft) high, 50 cm (1.6 ft) in diameter and move around on wheels. They have an arm with little wheels to control the ball and a kicker to shoot. Because the hardware is mostly standardized the development teams have to make the difference with the software.

Once the game starts the developers aren’t allowed to aid or moderate the robots. Therefore the bots are equipped with all the hardware they need to play soccer autonomously. They’re mounted with a camera and a laser scanner to locate the ball and determine the distance. A Wi-Fi network allows the team members to communicate with each other and determine the strategy.

The game is played on a field similar to a scaled human soccer field. Playing time is limited to two halves of 15 minutes each. The teams consist of five players. If a robot does not function properly it may be taken of the field for a reset while the game continues. There is a human referee who’s decisions are communicated to the bots over the Wi-Fi network.

The Dutch Open finals were between home team TechUnited and MRL from Iran. The Dutch bots scored their first goal within minutes of the start of the game to the excitement of the predominantly orange-clad audience. Shortly thereafter a TechUnited bot went renegade and had to be taken out of the field for a reset. But even with a bot less the Dutchies scored again. When the team increased their lead to 3 – 0 the match seemed all but won. But in the second half MRL came back strong and had everyone on the edge of their seats by scoring two goals.

When the referee signaled the end of the game, the score was 3-2 for TechUnited. By winning the tournament the Dutch have established themselves as a favorite for the World Cup held in Mexico in June. Maybe, just maybe, the Dutch will finally bring home a Soccer World Cup trophy.

The following video shows a match between The Netherlands and Iran. The Netherlands won 2-1.

TechTheFuture.com is part of the Elektor group. 

 

Q&A: Lawrence Foltzer (Communications Engineer)

In the U.S., a common gift to give someone when he or she finishes school or completes a course of career training is Dr. Seuss’s book, Oh, the Place You’ll Go. I thought of the book’s title when I first read our May interview with engineer Lawrence Foltzer. After finishing electronics training in the U.S. Navy, Foltzer found himself working in such diverse locations as a destroyer in Mediterranean Sea, IBM’s Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY, and Optilink, DSC, Alcatel, and Turin Networks in Petaluma, CA. Simply put: his electronics training has taken him to many interesting places!

Foltzer’s interests include fiber optic communication, telecommunications, direct digital synthesis, and robot navigation. He wrote four articles for Circuit Cellar between June 1993 and March 2012.

Lawrence Foltzer presented these frequency-domain test instruments in Circuit Cellar 254 (September 2011). An Analog Devices AD9834-based RFG is on the left. An AD5930-based SFG is on the right. The ICSP interface used to program a Microchip Technology PIC16F627A microcontroller is provided by a dangling RJ connector socket. (Source: L. Foltzer, CC254)

Below is an abridged version of the interview now available in Circuit Cellar 262 (May 2012).

NAN: You spent 30 years working in the fiber optics communication industry. How did that come about? Have you always had an interest specifically in fiber optic technology?

LARRY: My career has taken me many interesting places, working with an amazing group of people, on the cusp of many technologies. I got my first electronics training in the Navy, both operating and maintaining the various anti-submarine warfare systems including the active sonar system; Gertrude, the underwater telephone; and two fire-control electromechanical computers for hedgehog and torpedo targeting. I spent two of my four years in the Navy in schools.

When I got out of the Navy in 1964, I managed to land a job with IBM. I’d applied for a job maintaining computers, but IBM sent me to the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. They gave me several tests on two different visits before hiring me. I was one of four out of forty who got a job. Mine was working in John B. Gunn’s group, preparing Gunn-oscillator samples and assisting the physicists in the group in performing both microwave and high-speed pulsed measurements.

One of my sample preparation duties was the application of AuGeNi ohmic contacts on GaAs samples. Ohmic contacts were essential to the proper operation of the Gunn effect, which is a bulk semiconductor phenomenon. Other labs at the research center were also working with GaAs for other devices: the LED, injection laser diode, and Hall-effect sensors to name a few. It turned out that the evaporated AuGeNi contact used on the Gunn devices was superior to the plated AuSnIn contact, so I soon found myself making 40,000 A per square centimeter pulsed-diode lasers. A year later I transferred to Gaithersburg, MD, to IBM-FSD where I was responsible for transferring laser diode technology to the group that made battlefield laser illuminators and optical radars. We used flexible light guides to bring the output from many lasers together to increase beam brightness.

As the Vietnam war came to an end, IBM closed down the Laser and Quantum Electronics (LQE) group I was in, but at the same time I received a job offer to join Comsat Labs, Clarksburg, MD, from an engineer for whom I had built Gunn devices for phased array studies. So back to the world of microwaves for a few years where I worked on the satellite qualification of tunnel (Asaki) diodes, Impatt diodes, step-recovery diodes, and GaAs FETs.

About a year after joining Comsat Labs, the former head of the now defunct IBM-LQE group, Bill Culver, called on me to help him prove to the army that a “single-fiber,” over-the-hill guided missile could replace the TOW missile and save soldier lives from the target tanks counterfire.

NAN: Tell us about some of your early projects and the types of technologies you used and worked on during that time.

LARRY: So, in 1973-ish, Bill Culver, Gordon Gould (Laser Inventor), and I formed Optelecom, Inc. In those days, when one spoke of fiber optics, one meant fiber bundles. Single fibers were seen as too unreliable, so hundreds of fibers were bundled together so that a loss of tens of fibers only caused a loss of a few percent of the injected light. Furthermore, bundles presented a large cross section to the primitive light sources of the day, which helped increase transmission distances.

Bill remembered seeing one of C. L. Stong’s Amateur Scientist columns in Scientific American about a beam balance based on a silica fiber suspension. In that column, Stong had shown that silica fibers could be made with tensile strengths 20 times that of steel. So a week later, Bill and I had constructed a fiber drawing apparatus in my basement and we drew the first few meters of fiber of the approximately 350 km of fiber we made in my home until we captured our first army contract and opened an office in Gaithersburg, MD.

Our first fibers were for mechanical-strength development. Optical losses measured hundreds of dBs/km in those days. But our plastic clad silica (PCS) fiber losses pretty much tracked those of Corning, Bell Labs, and ITT-EOPD (Electro-Optics Products Division). Pretty soon we were making 8 dB/km fibers up to 6 km in length. I left Optelecom when follow-on contracts with the army slowed; but by that time we had demonstrated missile payout of 4 km of signal carrying fiber at speeds of 600 ft/s, and slower speed runs from fixed-wing and Helo RPVs. The first video games were born!

At Optelecom I also worked with Gordon Gould on a CO2 laser-based secure communications system. A ground-based laser interrogated a Stark-effect based modulator and retro-reflector that returned a video signal to the ground station. I designed and developed all of that system’s electronics.

Government funding for our fiber payout work diminished, so I joined ITT-EOPD in 1976. In those days, if you needed a connector or a splice, or a pigtailed LED, laser or detector, you made it yourself; and I was good with my hands. So, in addition to running programs to develop fused fiber couplers, etc., I was also in charge of the group that built the emitters and detectors needed to support the transmission systems group.

NAN: You participated in Motorola’s IEEE-802 MAC subcommittee on token-passing access control methods. Tell us about that experience.

NAN: How long have you been designing MCU-based systems? Tell us about your first MCU-based design.

LARRY: I was in Motorola’s strategic marketing department (SMD) when the Apple 2 first came on the scene. Some of the folks in the SMD were the developers of the RadioShack color computer. Long story short, I quickly became a fan of the MC6809 CPU, and wrote some pretty fancy code for the day that rotated 3-D objects, and a more animated version of Space Invaders. I developed a menu-driven EPROM programmer that could program all of the EPROMs then available and then some. My company, Computer Accessories of AZ, advertised in Rainbow magazine until the PC savaged the market. I sold about 1,200 programmers and a few other products before closing up shop.

NAN: Circuit Cellar has published four of your articles about design projects. Your first article, “Long-Range Infrared Communications” was published in 1993 (Circuit Cellar 35). Which advances in IR technology have most impressed and excited you since then?

LARRY: Vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL). The Japanese were the first to realize their potential, but did not participate in their early development. Honeywell Optoelectronics was the first to offer 850-nm VCSELs commercially. I think I bought my first VCSELs from Hamilton Avnet in the late 1980s for $6 a pop. But 850 nm is excluded from Telecom (Bellcore), so companies like Cielo and Picolight went to work on long wavelength parts. I worked with Cielo on 1310-nm VCSEL array technology while at Turin Networks, and actually succeeded in adding VCSEL transmitter and array receiver optics to several optical line cards. It was my hope that VCSELs would find their way into the fiber to the home (FTTH) systems of the future, delivering 1 Gbps or more for 33% of what it costs today.

Circuit Cellar 262 (May 2012) is now on newsstands.