Raspberry Pi Now Shipping

Got Raspberry Pi? Probably not. But rest assured. The wait is almost over.

After receiving an inquiry about the status of Raspberry Pi from a Circuit Cellar member earlier today, I decided to do a bit of research. It didn’t take long to figure out that hundreds of thousands of orders have been placed and shipping has begun.

Raspberry Pi (Source: Raspberry Pi Foundation & posted on Elektor.com)

TheInquirer.net reported last week that more than 350,000 orders have been placed since February and the next shipments are scheduled for May.

According to an April 18 post by element14′s Sagar Jethani, shipping is underway and “will be made strictly in the order that commitments were received within each region — Europe, Asia, and the Americas.” He added that “Everyone who ordered before 18th April will definitely receive their Raspberry Pi before the end of June. Those placing new orders from today can expect a July delivery.”

I encourage Circuit Cellar members to tell us what they think about Raspberry Pi once their receive their orders. We’ll be happy to review project articles for publication in print or online.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s compact (85.60 mm × 53.98 mm × 17 mm) single-bard computer features a Broadcom BCM2835, an ARM1176JZFS, and a Videocore 4 GPU. The ARM GNU/Linux system costs $25.

You can order the Raspberry Pi from element14 and RS Components.

Check out my first Raspberry Pi post for additional information.

Issue 262: Advances in Measurement & Sensor Tech

As I walked the convention center floor at the 2012 Design West conference in San Jose, CA, it quickly became clear that measurement and sensor technologies are at the forefront of embedded innovation. For instance, at the Terasic Technologies booth, I spoke with Allen Houng, Terasic’s Strategic Marketing Manager, about the VisualSonic Studio project developed by students from National Taiwan University. The innovative design—which included an Altera DE2-115 FPGA development kit and a Terasic 5-megapixel CMOS sensor (D5M)—used interactive tokens to control computer-generated music. Sensor technology figured prominently in the design. It was just one of many exciting projects on display.

In this issue, we feature articles on a variety of measurement-and sensor-related embedded design projects. I encourage you to try similar projects and share your results with our editors.

Starting on page 14, Petre Tzvetanov Petrov describes a multilevel audible logical probe design. Petrov states that when working with digital systems “it is good to have a logical probe with at least four levels in order to more rapidly find the node in the circuit where things are going wrong.” His low-cost audible logical probe indicates four input levels, and there’s an audible tone for each input level.

Matt Oppenheim explains how to use touch sensors to trigger audio tags on electronic devices (p. 20). His design is intended to help visually impaired users. But you can use a few capacitive-touch sensors with an Android device to create the application of your choice.

The portable touch-sensor assembly. The touch-sensor boards are mounted on the back of a digital radio, connected to a IOIO board and a Nexus One smartphone. The Android interface is displayed on the phone. (Source: M. Oppenheim)

Two daisy-chained Microchip Technology mTouch boards with a battery board providing the power and LED boards showing the channel status. (Source: M. Oppenheim)

Read the interview with Lawrence Foltzer on page 30 for a little inspiration. Interestingly, one of his first MCU-based projects was a sonar sensor.

The impetus for Kyle Gilpin’s “menU” design was a microprocessor-based sensor system he installed in his car to display and control a variety of different sensors (p. 34).

The design used to test the menU system on the mbed processor was intentionally as simple as possible. Four buttons drive the menu system and an alphanumeric LCD is used to display the menu. Alternatively, one can use the mbed’s USB-to-serial port to connect with a terminal emulator running on a PC to both display and control the menu system. (Source: K. Gilpin)

The current menU system enables Gilpin to navigate through a hierarchical set of menu items while both observing and modifying the parameters of an embedded design.

The menU system is generic enough to be compiled for most desktop PCs running Windows, OSX, or Linux using the Qt development framework. This screenshot demonstrates the GUI for the menU system. The menu itself is displayed in a separate terminal window. The GUI has four simulated LEDs and one simulated photocell all of which correspond to the hardware available on the mbed processor development platform. (Source: K. Gilpin)

The final measurement-and-sensor-related article in this issue is columnist Richard Wotiz’s “Camera Image Stabilization” (p. 46). Wotiz details various IS techniques.

Our other columnists cover accelerated testing (George Novacek, p. 60), energy harvesting (George Martin, p. 64), and SNAP engine versatility (Jeff Bachiochi, p. 68).

Lastly, I’m excited to announce that we have a new columnist, Patrick Schaumont, whose article “One-Time Passwords from Your Watch” starts on page 52.

The Texas Instruments eZ430 Chronos watch displays a unique code that enables logging into Google’s Gmail. The code is derived from the current time and a secret value embedded in the watch. (Source: P. Schaumont)

Schaumont is an Associate Professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. His interests include embedded security, covering hardware, firmware, and software. Welcome, Patrick!

Circuit Cellar 262 (May 2012) is now available.

Wireless Data Control for Remote Sensor Monitoring

Circuit Cellar has published dozens of interesting articles about handy wireless applications over the years. And now we have another innovative project to report about. Circuit Cellar author Robert Bowen contacted us recently with a link to information about his iFarm-II controller data acquisition system.

The iFarm-II controller data acquisition system (Source: R. Bowen)

The design features two main components. Bowen’s “iFarm-Remote” and the “iFarm-Base controller” work together to as an accurate remote wireless data acquisition system. The former has six digital inputs (for monitoring relay or switch contacts) and six digital outputs (for energizing a relay’s coil). The latter is a stand-alone wireless and internet ready controller. Its LCD screen displays sensor readings from the iFarm-Remote controller. When you connect the base to the Internet, you can monitor data reading via a browser. In addition, you can have the base email you notifications pertaining to the sensor input channels.

You can connect the system to the Internet for remote monitoring. The Network Settings Page enables you to configure the iFarm-Base controller for your network. (Source: R. Bowen)

Bowen writes:

The iFarm-II Controller is a wireless data acquisition system used to remotely monitor temperature and humidity conditions in a remote location. The iFarm consists of two controllers, the iFarm-Remote and iFarm-Base controller. The iFarm-Remote is located in remote location with various sensors (supports sensors that output +/-10VDC ) connected. The iFarm-Remote also provides the user with 6-digital inputs and 6-digital outputs. The digital inputs may be used to detect switch closures while the digital outputs may be used to energize a relay coil. The iFarm-Base supports either a 2.4GHz or 900Mhz RF Module.

The iFarm-Base controller is responsible for sending commands to the iFarm-Remote controller to acquire the sensor and digital input status readings. These readings may be viewed locally on the iFarm-Base controllers LCD display or remotely via an Internet connection using your favorite web-browser. Alarm conditions can be set on the iFarm-Base controller. An active upper or lower limit condition will notify the user either through an e-mail or a text message sent directly to the user. Alternatively, the user may view and control the iFarm-Remote controller via web-browser. The iFarm-Base controllers web-server is designed to support viewing pages from a PC, Laptop, iPhone, iTouch, Blackberry or any mobile device/telephone which has a WiFi Internet connection.—Robert Bowen, http://wireless.xtreemhost.com/

iFarm-Host/Remote PCB Prototype (Source: R. Bowen)

Robert Bowen is a senior field service engineer for MTS Systems Corp., where he designs automated calibration equipment and develops testing methods for customers involved in the material and simulation testing fields. Circuit Cellar has published three of his articles since 2001:

Elektor Weekly Wrap-Up: Publishing Process Video, Inside May 2012, & a New Book on LEDs

What your plans for this weekend? Any projects in the works? Before you start soldering, consider what Elektor staffers have been working in this week. Perhaps you’ll want to start designing with the goal of submitting your project to the Elektor Lab. Check out the video below for details.

If you don’t have a project yet, no worries. The currently available May issue is chock full of interesting articles and projects.

May Issue Intro Video

My friend and colleague Wisse Hettinga does a wonderful job each month introducing the newest issue of Elektor. This week he released the May intro video:

Inside Elektor May 2012

Here is the table of contents for the latest edition of Elektor:

  • Embedded World 2012
  • The RL78 Green Energy Challenge has begun
  • Embedded Linux Made Easy (1)
  • Platino Controlled by LabVIEW (1)
  • Preamplifier 2012 (2)
  • Lossless Load
  • Inside Pico C-Super
  • Mounting nixie tubes
  • E-LABs INSIDE
  • Minty Geek’s Mark Brickley
  • QuadroWalker
  • Electronics for Starters (5)
  • AVR Software Defined Radio (3)
  • Component Tips: MOSFETs + extras
  • Energy Monitor
  • SHT11 Humidity Sensor Connected to PC
  • RAMBOard-Serial
  • Retronics: Elektor Logic Analyser (1981)
  • Hexadoku
  • Gerard’s Columns: Reliability

New Book on LED Designs & Projects

Ask anyone under 20 to mention a light source and you’re likely to hear “el-ee-dee.” It just goes to show that LEDs are succeeding the light bulb at a terrific pace. Now ask any high school kid to mention an electronic component. You’ll hear the same acronym again. Kids positively adore LEDs: they’re cheap, simple to connect, and allow all sorts of things to be personalized, tweaked, and adorned with bright colors, preferably in strings and flashing too.

Editor Jan Buiting at Elektor this week signed off the production of a small book on LEDs specifically aimed at young people. The idea is to help them learn about these fantastic devices. The book is packed with entry-level projects that can be built straight off on a breadboard. With one-stop shopping in mind, Elektor will also be selling a nice parts kit that belongs with the book that will enable readers to gain some hands-on experience working with LEDs.

The new book and the associated kit are expected to come on sale by June 1, 2012. Check the Elektor webpage www.elektor.com/products/books.255.lynkx at that time.

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor group publication.

Elektor Weekly Wrap-Up: Project Generator, 32-Bit Linux on an 8-Bit MCU, & Computer Vision Simplified

Last week Elektor staffers put in a long workweek of, well, a little bit of everything: lab work, news reporting, and book launching. Let’s start with the lab.

Elektor’s Project Generator Edition

The Elektor Lab’s workers were finishing up their final lab duties relating to Elektor’s upcoming double summer edition—the Project Generator Edition, PGE.

Elektor Lab staff preps for the summer issue

Thijs Beckers reported: “Extra attention is paid to the quality of this year’s projects, after upping the standards already in the selection process. We set an ambitious goal for all of us, lab workers and editors alike, to bring you articles and circuit ideas from the utmost quality, with crystal clear details and lots of PCB layouts. All of this would of course be unfeasible without our highly respected freelance contributors and experts, who we are grateful for their efforts in supporting this year’s extra-thick magazine with fresh and exciting projects and circuits.”

Getting read for the "Project Generator Edition"

32-Bit Linux on an 8-Bit MCU

Elektor editor Clemens Valens reported last week about an interesting project by Dmitry Grinberg. Clemens said Dmitry ported a 32-bit operating system to an 8-bit microcontroller lacking most of the features needed to actually run the OS. Seem odd? Learn more here.

A 32-bit OS ported to an 8-bit micro

Computer Vision Simplified

Elektor announced Wednesday a new book on the topic of computer vision. Fevzi Özgül’s Design your own PC Visual Processing and Recognition System in C# is intended for “engineers, scientists and enthusiasts with developed programming skills or with a strong interest in image processing technology on a PC.”

The book, which Özgül wrote using Microsoft C# and utilizing object-oriented practices, is a practical how-to guide. He covers essential image-processing techniques and provides practical application examples so you can produce high-quality image processing software. Click here for more information.

CircuitCellar.com is an Elektor group publication.