Elektor RF & Microwave App for Android

Elektor has an iPhone/iPad app for several months. And now Android users can have an Elektor app of their own. The Elektor RF & Microwave Toolbox app is perfect for engineers and RF technicians who need easy, reliable access to essential equations, converters, calculators, and tools.

A screenshot of the Elektor RF & Microwave app for Android

The app includes the following handy tools:

1.Noise floor (Kelvin,dBm)
2.Amplifier cascade (NF, Gain, P1db, OIP2, OIP3)
3.Radar equation (2-way path loss)
4.Radio equation (1-way path loss)
5.Power and voltage converter (W,dBm,V,dBµV)
6.Field intensity and power density converter (W/m2, V/m, A/m, Tesla, Gauss,dBm, W)
7.Mismatch error limits (VSWR, Return loss)
8.Reflectometer (VSWR, Return loss)
9.Mitered Bend
10.Divider and Couplers (Wilkinson, Rat race, Branchline , microstrip and lumped)
11.Balanced and und balanced PI and T attenuator
12.Skin depth (DC and AC resistance)
13.PCB Trace calculator (impedance/dimensions)
14.Image rejection (amplitude and phase imbalance)
15.Mixer harmonics (up and down conversion)
16.Helical antenna
17.Peak to RMS (peak, RMS, average, CF)
18.Air Core Inductor Inductance
19.Parallel plate Capacitor
20.PI and T attenuator
21.Ohm’s Law
22.Parallel LCR impedance/resonance
23.Series LCR impedance/resonance
24.Inductor impedance
25.Capacitance impedance
26.Antenna temperature (Kelvin)
27.Radar Cross Section (RCS) calculator (Sphere,Cylinder, flat plate, corners, dBsm)
28.Noise Figure Y-Factor Method
29.EMC (EIRP, ERP, dBµV/m)
30.Noise figure converter (dB, linear, Kelvin)
31.Frequency Band Designations
32.Resistor color code (reverse lookup, 3 to 6 band)
33.Filter Design (Butterworth, Chebyshev, prototype):
34.µ-Filter Design (microstrip, stripline)
35.PCB Trace Width and Clearance Calculator

Visit the Android Market for more information about the Elektor app.

Circuit Cellar does not yet have an app for Android. The Circuit Cellar iPhone/iPad app is available on iTunes.

Screenshots of the Circuit Cellar app

Elektor International Media is the parent company of Circuit Cellar.

Issue 260: EQ Answers

These are the answers to the EQ questions that appeared in Circuit Cellar 260 (March 2012).

Problem 1—In an RS-232 interface, why is the idle or “mark” level a negative voltage?

Answer 1—RS-232 was developed in the days when people were connecting electromechanical teletypes to telephone lines with modems, and in fact, at that time the design of any equipment connected to a phone line was tightly controlled by the phone company.

The reason RS-232 uses a negative voltage for its idle state is the same reason the phone lines themselves use a negative voltage relative to ground for power—copper wires in long cables potentially exposed to moisture are significantly less likely to corrode if they have a negative DC bias on them.

Problem 2—Similarly, why does the “mark” level correspond to a logical “high” level on the TTL side of the interface?

Answer 2—Again, back in the days when RS-232 was developed, the primary logic families in use were DTL and TTL. Both of these technologies draw significantly less power when a signal is in the high state than in the low state, so the high state is preferred for the inactive state of any signal.

Problem 3—What does the following C function compute? You may assume the input argument is a positive integer.

Answer 3—Remember the algorithm that computes integer square roots by subtracting successive odd numbers from the input value? This function extends that concept to computing integer cube roots.

The reason this works is that taking the differences between successive values is the discrete equivalent of taking a derivative in the continuous world. The derivative of a cubic curve is a quadratic, and the derivative of a quadratic is a straight line. To generate a “straight line” in the discrete world, you just add a constant to a variable.

When you look at successive squares—0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, etc.—the differences are 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, etc. This is why the algorithm that subtracts odd numbers works for computing square roots.

When you look at the successive cubes—0, 1, 8, 27, 64, 125, etc.—the first set of differences is the sequence 1, 7, 19, 37, 61, etc. This doesn’t look very useful until you take the differences between those numbers, which are: 6, 12, 18, 24, etc., which is obviously another straight line.

Problem 4—Suppose you are given some calibration constants for a sensor in the form of four-digit hexadecimal (16-bit) integers, and you are told that the format of these numbers is “7 integer bits and 9 fractional bits.” How would you go about converting these constants to floating-point so that you could, for example, work with them in a spreadsheet?

Answer 4—The direct way to convert numbers in an arbitrary fixed-point representation to the equivalent floating-point value is to figure out what the representation for “1.000” would be in the fixed-point notation and then divide the given numbers by that constant.

In this case, with 7 integer bits and 9 fraction bits, “1.000” would be represented as binary 0000001.000000000, or 0×0200. So, if you are given a constant of, say, 0×5453, just divide it by 0×0200 to find out that it represents the value “42.162.”

Contributed by David Tweed (eq at circuitcellar.com)

Issue 260: Creativity in Design

The seed for the interview with Hanno Sander on page 16 (Circuit Cellar March 2012) was sown at the 2008 Embedded Systems Conference in San Jose, CA. Hanno was at the Parallax booth demonstrating his “Dancebot,” which is a Propeller-based, two-wheeled balancing robot he wrote about in Circuit Cellar 224 (March 2009).

Balancing robot design (Source: Hanno Sander CC260)

Since Circuit Cellar is scheduled to publish Hanno’s book Advanced Control Robotics later this year, it made sense to interview him for our annual Robotics issue. As you’ll learn, Hanno is an enthusiastic designer whose intellect and passion for engineering have enabled him to travel the world and make electronics innovation his life’s work. His story should be an inspiration to everyone who reads this magazine.

After you finish the interview, check out the two robotics-related articles featured in this issue.

Square playing field (Source: Larry Foltzer CC260)

First, on page 20, Larry Foltzer tackles the topic of robot navigation with a fascinating article about position determination and acoustic delay triangulation. Next, turn to the back of the issue for Jeff Bachiochi’s article, “Wheel-Free Mobile Robots” (p. 64). Jeff takes you inside a Freescale FSLBOT mechatronics robot. Study the concepts he covers to prepare yourself for your next mobile robot design.

The rest of the issue includes a variety of articles on creative designs and essential engineering topics. I’m sure you’ll agree that the following articles are just as inspirational as they are informative.

Engineer and video game enthusiast Chris Cantrell explains how he built a Propeller-based TV gaming platform (p. 28). He describes how he hacked a joystick and got the classic Space Invaders video game up and running.

Propeller-based gaming platform (Source: Chris Cantrell CC260)

On page 36, Charles Edmondson presents his Rainbow Color Reader. The compact design can identify and announce colors for visually impaired users.

In the February issue, Alexander Pozhitkov introduced the NakedCPU project. This month he wraps up the article series by describing actual experiments and sets the foundation for future research (p. 42).

On page 50, George Novacek helps you prepare for the inevitable: microelectronic component obsolescence. You’ll find his tips invaluable as you move on to new projects.

Interested in the topic of thermal detection? Want to know how IR thermal sensing works? Turn to Richard Wotiz’s article on page 54.

On page 60, columnist George Martin provides his next engineering lesson learned from a real-world project. This month he covers the topic of working with—or without?—printer port connections.

I’d like to wrap up with a note to our staff and long-time readers. This is the 260th issue of Circuit Cellar. That’s quite an achievement! Thank you, colleagues, friends, and readers!

Circuit Cellar Issue 260 March 2012

Voice Coil Parts & Production

Voice coils are essential elements in loudspeakers of all sorts. Thus, understanding how a voice coil works is essential for audio engineers and DIYers alike. The main parts the bobbin, the voice coil wire, and the collar. Mike Klasco and Steve Tatarunis of Menlo Scientific provide in-depth information about voice coils in the March 2012 issue of audioXpress magazine.

The parts of a voice coil (Source: Precision Econowind)

Klaso and Tatarunis write:

“The bobbin provides a rigid structure on which the voice coil wire can be wound and the collar can serve several purposes. It secures the coil lead-out wires, reinforces the bobbin, and provides a convenient material for diaphragm attachment … In some cases—headphone speakers, for example—a monolithic (self supporting no bobbin or collar) voice coil may be used. But this article will focus on the more commonly used bobbin, coil, and collar designs.

Loudspeaker voice coils are seldom considered critical elements that contribute to sound quality, and few technical papers have addressed this issue. But when designing a voice coil, the selection and application of materials can have profound effects upon sound quantity, quality, and power handling. The mechanical energy from the winding stack moves by transconduction through the bobbin and collar before reaching the diaphragm. Any non-linearities in this path are superimposed upon the response of the speaker. Intrinsic characteristics of materials such as internal damping and Young’s modulus create specific sonic signatures and contribute to the residual distortion spectrum of the transducer … In selecting a particular material, a coil winder makes important trade-offs on the winding process. Knowledge of these variables can ensure better, more cost-effective coils, avoid conflicts, and improve production yields. Torsional resonances, internal losses, and electrical conductivity of the bobbin materials are some of the factors effecting the distortion, sensitivity, and sound quality of the finished loudspeaker.”

A close-up view of both a good voice coil and a burned voice coil (Source: The Speaker Exchange)

You can read the entire article here. For subscription information, go to www.audioamateur.com.

audioXpress magazine, like Circuit Cellar, is an Elektor group publication.